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Moore s Hill College 
Bulletin 




CATALOGUE NUMBER 



1 9 08 - 1909 




Publlthed by 
MOORE SHI L L C L L E G E 
Moore § Hill, Indiana H 



VOL III. No. 9 

oores Hill College 
Bulletin 




CATALOGUE NUMBER 




ay 29, 1909 



Published by the Trustees of Moores Hill College, Moores Hill, Indiana 



ENTERED AS FCCOND-CLA8S MATTER APRIL 26, 1 SOT, AT THE POSTOFFICE AT MOORBS HILL, 
INDIANA, UNDER THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF JULY 16. 1884 





















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Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



C®fei® CllIfeIB]dkIr , 



1 9 O 9 

June io and n, Thursday and Friday Examination of Classes 

June 11-17 Exercises of Commencement Week 

June 13, Sunday Baccalaureate and Annual Sermons 

June 15, Tuesday .... Annual Meeting Board of Trustees and Visitors 

June 17, Thursday Fifty-third Annual Commencement 

June 21, Monday Second Half of Summer Term Opens 

September 21, Tuesday.- Fall Term Opens 

October 21, Thursday Formal Opening Exercises 

November 4, Thursday Senior Orations 

November 18, Thursday Junior Orations 

December 2, Thursday Oratorical Contest 

December 16, Thursday Term Concert 

December 21 and 22, Tuesday and Wednesday. . .Term Examinations 
December 22, Wednesday Holiday Vacation Begins 

1 9 1 O 

January 4, Tuesday Second Term Begins 

January 27, Thursday Day of Prayer for Colleges 

March 10, Thursday Term Concert 

March 19, Saturday Annual Athletic Carnival 

March 23 and 24, Wednesday and Thursday Term Examinations 

March 24, Thursday Second Term Closes 

March 29, Tuesday Spring Term Opens 

April 14, Thursday Sophomore Orations 

April 28, Thursday ". Freshman Orations 

May 9, Monday Opening First Half of Summer Term 

June 9 and 10, Thursday and Friday Examination of Classes 

June 10-16 Exercises of Commencement Week 

June 12, Sunday Baccalaureate and Annual Sermons 

June 12, Sunday Annual College Love-Feast and Reunion of 

Christian Associations. 
June 14, Tuesday. .. .Annual Meeting Board of Trustees and Visitors 

June 16, Thursday Fifty-fourth Annual Commencement 

June 20, Monday....: Opening Second Half of Summer Term 

September 20, Tuesday Opening of Fall Term 



CORPORATION 



Ex-Offioio, William S. Bovard, A. M., D. D.. President off College 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

First Class — Term Expires 1909 

Hon. J. E. Watson, Rushville 

Rev. J. W. Duncan, D. D., Evansville 

William E. Stark, Cincinnati 

George Wood, Aurora 

Rev. A. R. Beach, A. M., D. D., New Albany 

Rev. J A. Sargent, D. D., Indianapolis 

Chas. M. Bowers Moores Hill 

Rev E. H. Wood, D. D., Bloomfield 

Charles Robertson, Cincinnati 

Second Class — Term Expires 1910 

Rev. J. W. Dashiell, D D Fairland 

Rev. C. C. Edwards, D. D., Moores Hill 

Dr. J. H. Morrison, M. D., Hartsville 

Rev. M. B. Hyde, D. D., Indianapolis 

J. F. Spencer, M. D., ....Moores Hill 

W. H. Whittaker, .• Jeffersonville 

A. A. Schwartz, Jt- ffersonville 

W. B. Grimes, New Albany 

H. J. Walsman, Batesville 

Third Class — Term Expires 191 1 

Bishop David H. Moore, D. D., L. L. D., Cincinnati, O. 

Hanson D. Moore, Moores Hill 

W. A. Jessup, Madison 

J. W. French, Moores Hill 

Benjamin F. Adams, Jr., Bloomington 

Q. Robert Hauss, A. M., M. D., Sellersburg 

D. F. Holt, Ph. D., Moores Hill 

Hon. Win. O'Brien, Lawrenceburg 

Rev. R. H. Moore, D. D., Martinsville 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



Conference Visitors 

Rev. A. D. Batchelor, S. T. B Franklin 

Rev. G. M. Smith, D. D., Shelbyville 

Rev. W. G. Clinton, A. M Indianapolis 

Rev. E. I. Larue, A. M., Corydon 

Rev. U. G. Abbott, A.M., Brownsville 

Rev. W. R. Ashby, S. T. B Mt. Vernon 

Alumni Visitors 

Rev. William F. Smith., A. M., Ph. D., Connersville 

Rev. Monroe Vayhinger, A. M., B. D., Upland 

Officers of the Board of Trustees 

E. H. Wood, Bloomfield, President 

M. B. Hyde, Indianapolis, Vice-President 

D. P. Holt, Moores Hill, Secretary 

J. W. French, Moores Hill, '. Treasurer 

Committees of Board of Trustees 

Executive Committee 

W. S. Bovard, Pres., C. C. Edwards, Vice-Pres., D. P. Holt, Sec'y. 
J. H. Martin, J. F. Spencer, J. W. French, H. D. Moore, C. M. Bowers. 

Buildings and Grounds 

W. F. Smith, E. I. Larue, H. G. Walsman. 

Auditing Committee 

J. W. Dashiell, W. E. Stark, C. M. Bowers, U. G. Abbott, 

George Wood. 

Committee on Faculty 

C C. Edwards, J. A. Sargent, M. B. Hyde, A. R. Beach, H. D. Moore. 




Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



FACULTY 



REV. WILLIAM S. BOVARD, A. M., D. D., President 

(University of Southern California, Boston University) 

Professor of Philosophy 

REV. JOHN H. MARTIN, D. D. 

(Laurel Hill Academy, Ohio Wesleyan University) 

Emeritus Professor of Biblical Literature 

ANDREW J. BIGNEY, A. M., Vice-President 
(Moores Hill, Johns Hopkins, Marine Biological Laboratory) 
Professor of Natural Sciences 

BENJAMIN W. ALDRICH, A. M. 
(Hillsdale College, University of Chicago Graduate School) 
Professor of Ancient Languages 

CHARLES E. TORBET, A. M. 
(Ohio Wesleyan University) 
Professor of English and History 

CLARENCE E. SMITH, B. S., A. M. 

(DePauw University, Indiana State University) 

Professor of Mathematics and Physics 

ZENOS E. SCOTT 
(Indiana State Normal, State University) 
Professor of Educational Psychology and Method 

SARA CORD WARDER 
Training Teacher 

OSCAR R. FICKEN, B. S. 

(German Wallace College, Moores Hill College) 

Professor of Modern Languages 

ORA B. STEVENS, A. B. 

(Moores Hill College) 

Instructor in Greek and Latin and Physical Instructor for Women 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



FACULTY 



MRS. E. LOUISE WILLIAMS, Mus. B. 
(Providence, R. I., Hillsdale, Chicago) 
Principal of Music Department — Pianoforte. 

EARL KELLER, A. B., A. M. 
(Miami and Cincinnati) 
Instructor in Vocal Music and Public Speaking. 



JOHN FRED DASHIELL, B. S. 

(Moores Hill College) 

Instructor in History and English. 

ERNEST BROWN 
Physical Instructor and Assistant in Mathematics and History. 

ELIZABETH BROOKS 
(Indiana Business University) 
Instructor in Stenography and Bookkeeping. 

WM. E. CISSNA ; ; 

lutor in Conference Studies. 

ANDREW J. BIGNEY, Registrar 

OSCAR R. FICKEN, Secretary 

CHARLES E. TORBET, College Librarian 

C. EMORY SMITH, GAIL HTLLMAN, WALTER B. NILES 

Assistant Librarians 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



ENTERTAINMENTS, LECTURES AND ADDRESSES 

Bishop John M. Waldon D. D., LL. D., 

Dedicatory Address upon dedication of Carnegie Hall 
John P. D. John, D. D., 

1. "Did God Make Man or Man Make God?" 

2. Alamni Address. 

Rev. A. H. Pitkin, Ph. D., Columbus, Ind., 

Address Before Academy Graduates. 

Mr. Lawrence McTurnan, Indianapolis, 

Address Before Normal Graduates. 

Rev. Walter Cole, A. M., D. D,, Cincinnati, 

Commencement Address. 

Bishop David H. Moore, D. D., LL. D., Cincinnati, 

Inaugural Charge to President Bovard. 

Pres. W. S. Bovard, D. D., 

Inaugural Address, "My Educational Creed." 

Rev. Edgar Blake, Chicago, 

"The Continuity of Life." 

Rev. C. D. Wilson, Lawrenceburg Winter Term Address. 

Rev. H. O. Enwall, Cincinnati "The Meaning of Our Flag." 

Pres. W. L. Bryan, Indiana University, "Education." 

Dean Burris, Cincinnati University, 

"The Correlation of the University with the High School and 
Industrial Life." 

Rev. E. L. Eaton, D. D., "Ghosts, Goblins and Witches." 

Rev. E. R. Vest, Madison, Ind., Spring Term Address. 

Judge Charles F. Malsberry, Cincinnati, 

Life Work Talk on "The Law." 

Rev. John Ward, Jeffersonville, 

Life Work Talk on "The Ministry". 

Prof. F. D. Churchill 

Mr. E. J. Jaqua, State Secretary Y. M. C. A 

Miss Margery Melcher, State Secretary Y. W. C. A 

Miss Laura M. Robinson, Secretary Student Volunteers 

Rev. W. D. Parr, D. D., Kokomo 

LECTURE COURSE NUMBER, 1908-9 

F. B. Cooper, Impersonator 

Evelyn Bargelt Concert Company 

Scottish Singers 

Dr. Eugene May, "Come Up Smiling." 

Dr. Alfred Kummer "Work, the Law of the Universe." 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Geographical 

If lines be thought of connecting Indianapolis, Louisville and 
Cincinnati, the area comprised within the trinagle thus formed will 
consist of a rich agricultural tract containing many prosperous towns 
and villages and inhabited by law-abiding, intelligent and progressive 
people. Somewhat east of the center of the triangle on the crest of 
the last row of hills which rise from the Ohio river is picturesquely 
situated the village of Moores Hill. It lies 460 feet above the river 
and over 900 feet above the sea level on one of the highest points in 
Indiana. The land slopes in all directions from the town, thus afford- 
ing excellent natural drainage; this, no doubt, is one of the causes of 
the unusual healthfulness of the place. 

Historical 

The following dates will serve as a bare outline of the history of 
the College and will also show the remarkable expansion of recent 
years. 

!853- Several far-seeing philanthropists headed by John C. Moore 
resolved to establish a college at Moores Hill that should be devoted 
to Christian education. 

1854. Organization effected. 

1856. First building completed and College opened. 

1856-1898. Departments added, courses strengthened and build- 
ings improved from time to time. 

1898. Mann property north of the campus purchased and house 
fitted up for Ladies' Dormitory. 

1899. Will F. Stevens gymnasium built. 

1903. Fine brick building on Main street owned by Capt. H. D. 
Moore purchased and fitted up for Science Hall. Used by Scientific 
Department from 1903 to 1908. 

1906. Gift of $18,750 secured from Andrew Carnegie and ground 
broken for Carnegie Hall by Governor Hanly. 

1907. College re-incorporated. Corner stone of Carnegie Hall 
laid. College accredited by State Board of Education for preparing 
teachers in classes A and B. 

1908. Carnegie Hall completed, and dedicated June 18. The 
Faculty has been increased, and the courses of study revised twice, 
within the past decade. Every effort is made to keep abreast with 
the best educational thought and theories of the day. 



10 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

Organization 

Moores Hill College is under the management of a Board of 
Trustees consisting of the President of the College, ex-officio, 
and twenty-seven members elected by the Indiana Annual Conference, 
for a period of three years. In addition to the regular members, the 
Conference appoints six Conference visitors and two Alumni visitors, 
who meet with the Board and take part in its deliberations. 

The Board of Trustees has full power to receive and administer 
all funds, to appoint faculties, to confer degrees and to make all laws 
for the government of the institution. 

At the last meeting of the Indiana Legislature, the College was 
reincorporated and granted a new charter. 

Buildings 

The "Main College Building," as it has been called so many years, 
U a substantially built three-story brick. It contains an assembly 
hall (the former chapel), large, pleasant recitation rooms and society 
halls. 

The Will F. Stevens Gymnasium affords excellent advantages for 
work in physical culture for bcth men and women. It is 70x40 feet, 
thus having ample floor room for basket ball and other indoor sports. 

The Ladies' Dormitory furnishes a desirable home for young 
women of the College. 

Carnegie Hall. This splendid new fifty thousand dollar building, 
we feel justly proud of, in the belief that in simple substantial beauty 
and convenience it is not surpassed in the state It contains exclu- 
sive of halls and corridors, forty-eight rooms, consisting of laborato- 
ries, supply rooms, cloak rooms, lavatories, lecture rooms, chapel, li- 
brary, Christian Association and society halls. It is heated by steam, 
lighted with gas, has fine slate composition olackboards and is mod- 
ern and convenient in every respect. 

Besides these buildings and the former Music Hall the College 
owns the fine brick on Main street used for the past few years as a 
Science Hall. This building is 45 feet front by 70 deep ond contains 
three stories and basement. It is valuable property either for rental 
purposes or for College use as the future needs may demand. 
Religious Influence 

Moores Hill College does not seek to develop the mind alone, 
but believing that education consists of more than mere intellectual 
training, strives to bring to the highest possible state of development 
the three-fold nature of man — spirit, mind and body — and believing 
that spiritual interests are always paramount, the institution carefully 
=urrounds her students with Christian influences. Every one of the 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 11 

Faculty and about ninty per cent, of the students are professed Chris- 
tians. Devotional exercises are conducted in the chapel each morning 
by the Faculty. 

While the college is under control of the Methodist Episcopal 
church it is not sectarian, and nowhere in the chapel or class room is 
any distinction made in the direction of creed. On the contrary, any 
person of good moral character, irrespective of church affiliations, 
may become a student in this institution, and enjoy all its privileges. 
The Christian Associations 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 
are important factors of the college life. These Associations have 
made a rapid and strong growth and are among the most progressive 
in the state. At the coming of the new student, when he is especinlly 
velcomed and helped, and throughout his course, the Association 
seeks to throw about him the best influence. Splendid advantages 
are afforded in the five years' course of Bible study. Three mission 
study classes are maintained. These classes are supported by both 
Associations. Weekly religious meetings are held by each Associa- 
tion, which attract a large number of students. Delegates are sent 
to each state convention and to the summer conference at Lake Ge- 
neva, Wisconsin. Not only do the Associations contribute largely to 
the religious tone of the school, but they add much to the social life. 
Pleasant receptions and socials are given each term by the two Asso- 
ciations. 

Societies 

There are four well sustained literary societies, two for women — 
Sigournean and Castalian, and two for men — Philoneikean and Photo- 
zetean. They maintain a high standard of literary excellence, while 
giving due prominence to parliamentary drill and to the social side. 

Library 

During the autumn of 1908 the library was moved into its light, 
pleasant quarters in the east end, first story, of Carnegie Hall. It 
contains nearly five thousand volumes and more than two thousand 
pamphlets. Books especially adapted to the needs of the regular de- 
partments are being secured as rapidly as possible. Quite a number 
have been added during the past year and rhe magazine list increased. 
The reading tables are now well supplied with many of the best gen- 
eral literary and scientific, magazines as well as with daily, weekly 
and religious papers. A special library committee has supervision 
of the work and development of the library. 

Athletics 

That the physical nature might be developed and an interest in 
athletics fostered, the Moores Hill College Athletic Association was 



12 Mookes Hill College Bulletin. 

reorganized in 1903. The membership is open to all alumni and to 
the students and Faculty of the college. An executive committee 
composed of both students and faculty representatives conducts the 
business of the Association. The expenses of membership are placed 
at the minimum, and every effort is made by the executive committee, 
through judicious appropriations, to give to the Association the iaigest 
possible return for the amount thus invested. 
Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association is active and loyal. Yearly meetings 
are held with a banquet during commencement week. The members 
of this Association are having a large part in the new progressive 
movement of the college. 

The alumni of Indianapolis and vicinity have formed an Associa- 
tion and hold banquets in December each year. These occasions are 
a source of much pleasure, and the organization is an active ally of the 
College. 

The Charles Willard Lewis Memorial Scholarship 

The class of 1905, in memory of the late Doctor Charles Willard 
Lewis, formerly President of the College, offers a scholarship each 
year, open to the members of the Junior and Sophomore classes upon 
certain prescribed conditions. This scholarship will be awarded for 
the first time in 1909. 

The Woman's Auxiliary 

This organization has for its aim, the equipment and improve- 
ment of the college buildings. Any person paying the membership 
fee of one dollar a year has all the privileges of the society. 

A thousand women ought to enroll at once. Mrs. Clara B. 
Johnston is President. 

Special Instruction for Ministers 

Instruction is given to young men preparing for the ministry m 
the history, matter and art of sermon making and in sacred oratorv. 
A young men's ministerial association is maintained, sermons are 
preached by the students weekly and every opportunity given to 
develop the ability to preach. 

Special attention is given to effective Scripture and hymn reading. 
Frequent lectures are given by the President and ministers invited for 
this purpose. Historical and Pastoral Theology and Homiletics are 
carefully considered. 

Oratorical Association 

The College maintains an oratorical association for students in 
the college classes. Contests are held the first Thursday in Decem- 
ber. First and second prizes are awarded tor superiority in thought, 
style and delivery. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 13 

Examinations 

In all the departments of the College, written examinations are 
held at the close of each term, and special tests at the option of the 
teachers are held at irregular intervals during the term. A grade not 
lower than 75 per cent, is necessary to advancement. The daily grade 
of each student counts three-fourths of the term standing, and the ex- 
amination one-fourth. It is the endeavor of the institution 
to maintain a high standard of scholarship. No student whose aver- 
age grade is below 85 per cent, is permitted to take more than four 
studies, and then only with the consent of the Faculty. 




EXPENSES 



Board 



Clubs for young men provide meals at $1.60 to $2.00. Board in pri- 
vate families (meals, room, fuel and light) $2.50 to $3.25. Rooms, 
furnished, two students in a room (fuel and light extra) 50 cents for 
each student per week. Opportunities exist whereby students may 
board themselves. Students must consult college authorities before 
engaging boarding places. 

Tuition — Per Term 

College Department $10 00 

Academy 9 00 

Department of Education 10 00 

Incidental fee 3 00 

Library fee for every student 50 

Music — Piano, two lessons per week 18 00 

Harmony, two lessons per week 8 00 

Use of Piano, one hour daily, per term 1 50 

Use of Technicon, one-half hour daily, per week 10 

Voice Culture, two lessons per week 15 00 

Incidental fee for Music students alone 1 00 

Chorus 1 00 

Sight Reading in classes 3 00 

Public School Music 1 00 

Elocution — two private lessons per week 15 00 

Business Course 12 50 

Laboratory Fees — 

Chemistry 2 00 

Zoology 2 00 

Botany 1 00 

Physics 1 00 

Gymnasium Fee 50 

Tuition and fees are payable at the beginning of the term and must 

be paid within ten days, in default of which accounts are sent to bank 
for collection with additional charges. 

Total expense for the year, $150.00 to $250.00. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



Courses of Study 

The College of Liberal Arts offers three courses of study: 

The Classical Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
This course is designed for those who wish to put emphasis on the 
ancient languages. The electives, however, afford an excellent oppor- 
tunity for acquiring a general knowledge of a wide range of subjects 

The Scientific Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence. Emphasis is placed in this course on the physical sciences and 
modern languages. 

The Literary Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Letters. 
Emphasis is placed in this course upon the modern languages, litera- 
ture and history. 

Admission to the Freshman Class 

The terms of admission to the Freshman class are in general 
those recommended by the State Board of Education for graduation 
from commissioned high schools. 

Graduates of commissioned high schools will receive Freshman 
standing upon the presentation of certificates showing the studies 
pursued and the time spent upon them. 

Graduates of other high schools, academies, or seminaries may 
also receive Freshman standing, if such schools are recognized by the 
Faculty of the College. 

The course as outlined for high schools consists of the work of 
four years of at least eight months each. A year's work of daily reci- 
tations in one subject is the unit of measurement. Sixteen units are 
required for entrance to the College. The specific requirements are 
as follows: 

i. English, 3 units. English composition and American and 
English literature. 

2. Mathematics, 3 units. Algebra, including quadratics. Plane 
and Solid Geometry- 

3. Foreign Language, 3 units. Latin, Greek, German or French. 

4. History, 1 unit. General or Ancient History. 

5. Science, 1 unit. Physics, Chemistry, Geology, Zoology, or 
Botany. 

6. Electives, 5 units. 

The elective credits may be from any subjects taught in the high 
school; but students who are preparing for college will secure the 
best results by distributing their elective work as follows: Foreign 
language, two years; history, one or two years; science, one or two 
years. 



16 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

It should be noted that a student may offer the full sixteen units, 
and thus be entitled to Freshman standing, who has found it imprac- 
ticable to elect such studies as would enable him to proceed with 
certain Freshman subjects. To meet the needs of such students, 
especially of those who are deficient in a language, the College 
credits the necessary sub-Freshman work taken after entrance as col- 
legiate elective work. Such an arrangement makes it possible for the 
student to begin Latin, Greek, or German in the Freshman year. 

In case the student offers more than the prescribed amount of 
any subject, the excess may be credited to him on his college course. 
The College, however, reserves the right to determine whether or 
not the work presented for additional credit has been of such grade 
as to justify the giving of advanced credit. 

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS 

The following paragraphs explain more fully what is accepted 
for entrance in the several subjects: 

i. English. — The student at entrance should have a knowledge 
of the principles of English composition and should be able to write 
clearly, correctly, and idiomatically. No student can take up Fresh- 
man work successfully who is seriously deficient in spelling, punctu- 
ation, grammar, sentence structure, or paragraphing. 

The work in English and American Literature should include a 
thorough knowledge of ^he college entrance requirements in English, 
and familiarity with the lives of the authors studied and their rela- 
tion to the history of their times. 

Some work in English should be done in each of the four years 
of the high school course. 

2. Mathematics. — The admission requirements in mathematics 
include a knowledge of Algebra and of Plane and Solid Geometry. 
The student should have paid special attention to factoring, to the 
use of negative and fractional exponents and to the solving of radical 
and quadratic equations. In Geometry considerable attention should 
be paid to the solving of original problems. 

3. Foreign Languages. — The minimum requirement in foreign 
language is three units. The student will find it to his interest to 
present at least five units. No language should be studied for less 
than two years. Language credits may be chosen from the follow- 
ing: 

1. Latin. — (a) Elementary Latin, a year's work, (b) Caesar!s 
"Gallic War," three to four books, (c) Cicero's orations against Cat- 
iline and one or two others with some of the letters, (d) Virgil's 
"Aeneid," four to six books. Prose composition should be taken with 
the Caesar and Cicero. 



Moobes Hill College Bulletin. 17 

2. Greek. — (a) A year's work. A beginning Greek book, Ana- 
basis, and Greek prose composition, (b) Anabasis continued until 
three to four books are read; 1500 to 2000 lines of Homer's "Iliad;" 
prose composition. 

3. German. — (a) German Grammar, easy prose reading, and 
some conversational exercises, (b) Reading of German Classics 
such as "Lessing's "Minna von Barnhelm," Schiller's "Willhchn Tell," 
and Goethe's "Herman und Dorothea." A portion of the second 
year should be given to scientific German. Dippold's "Scientific 
German Reader" is suggested as a text. 

4. French. — (a) Studies in pronunciation and grammar with 
special attention to the verb; prose and easy reading, (b) Reading 
and composition. The reading matter should comprise both literary 
and scientific selections. 

4. History. — The student may present from one to three years 
of history. If but one year is presented, it should be General History 
or Ancient History. For the second and third years, Modern His- 
tory, English History, or a course in American History of high 
school grade may be presented. 

5. Science. — The student may present from one to three years 
of science. If but one unit is presented, it should be Physics or 
Botany. Wherever practicable both these subjects should be included 
in the high school work. Credits will also be received in Chemistry, 
Geology, or Zoology. The courses in science should be studied in 
connection with good laboratory facilities. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The term-hour is the unit used in reckoning the amount of work 
required for graduation. This unit consists of one class exercise a 
week in a study, continued throughout a term. The student is 
expected to complete sixteen of these term hours each term of the 
first two years of his course and fourteen each term of the last two 
years. 

Each candidate for a Bachelor's degree must complete before 
graduation one hundred and eighty term-hours of collegiate work in 
some one of the courses outlined below. 

In addition to this requirement, each student is required to take 
during his Freshman and Sophomore years six hours in the Depart- 
ment of Physical Education, or an equivalent permitted by the Fac- 
ulty. Two class exercises a week will count as one hour. 

The studies required for graduation are prescribed and elective. 
In the Classical Course one hundred and twenty hours are prescribed, 
in the Scientific and Literary, one hundred and twenty-eight. The 
remaining hours necessary to make up one hundred and eighty term- 
hours are elective under the following rules: 



18 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

The selection of any elective must have the approval of the head 
of the department from which the selection is made. 

No credit will be given for less than an entire course in an/ 
elective subject. 

The studies prescribed in one course are elective in those in 
which they are not prescribed. 

Studies not prescribed in any course are open to all students 
under restrictions stated in connection with the description of the 
studies. 

Parallel Courses 
The studies in the parallel courses are designated by the Roman 
numerals, which refer to the departments of the College of Liberal 
Arts described under Departments of the College page 21 and by let- 
ters, which refer to sub-divisions of the departments. The figures in 
parentheses designate the number of recitations a week in each term. 
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Departments of the College 



I. English Bible. 

II. Ancient Languages. 

III. Modern Languages. 

IV. English and History. 

V. Political and Social Sciences. 

VI. Physical Sciences. 

VIII. Philosophy. 

VII. Mathematics. 

IX. Education. 

X. Music. 

XI. Art. 

XII. Public Speaking. 

XIII. Physical Education. 

XIV. Graduate Department. 

I.— ENGLISH BIBLE 

President Bovard 

The Bible is an important factor in the world's education. This 
department is designed to furnish the student with an accurate con- 
ception of the contents of the Bible. The best text books are used. 
A careful study is made of Bible History, Biography, Literature and 
Geography. New Testament Greek, with exegetical notes, is read 
with the Professor in Greek. 

A. Bible Biography and Literature. — Prescribed for Freshmen 
in all courses unless they have had Course B. Elective for those who 
have had Course <B. Two hours a week for a year. Offered in 1909-10. 

B. Bible History and Geography. — Prescribed for Freshmen in 
all courses unless they have had Course A. Elective for those who 
have had Course A. Two hours a week for a year. Offered in 1910-11. 

C. Christian Evidences and Doctrine. — In this course a number 
of the conference studies are taken up. Elective for all students. 
Two hours for one year. 

Homiletics. — Designed for students preparing for the Christian 
ministry and prescribed for all students under license to preach. The 
class meets once a week during the fall and winter terms. For each 
year of work completed the student will receive a credit of one-half 
hour on college elective. 



22 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

II.— ANCIENT LANGUAGES 
Professor Aldrich 
Miss Stevens 
I. LATIN 

A. Freshman Latin. — Livy, Book I or XXI; Cicero, Cato Maior 
and Laelius; Horace, Odes and Epodes. Throughout the course 
questions of thought and style and of literary and historical value are 
made prominent with sight reading throughout the year. Prescribed 
for classical students, elective for others. Four hours a week for a 
year. 

B. Sophomore Latin. — Horace, Satires and Epistles; Tacitus, 
Germania and Agricola; Terence; Plautus. By a careful study of the 
art of Horace and Tacitus, an effort is made to help the student in 
literary criticism, while attention is given in the study of the latter 
author to the history of the times. In the last half of the year the 
development of the Roman Comedy is traced and the meters are 
studied. One play of Terence and several of Plautus are read. 
Prescribed for classical students unless Greek B or C is taken, in 
which case it is elective; elective for others. Four hours a week for 
a year. 

C. Junior Latin. — Selections from Suetonius, Pliny, Juvenal, 
Lucretius, Martial, with Virgil's Eclogues and Catullus as sight read- 
ing. The style and literary value of the author are considered and 
Roman life is constantly studied as revealed in these authors through 
the religion, philosophy and daily habits of the people. Elective for 
classical and literary students. Four hours a week for a year. 

In general Latin B and C will not be offered the same year but 
will alternate or be combined according to the needs and desires of 
the students. 

II. GREEK 

a. Beginning Greek. — Beginning Greek two terms; Xenophon's 
Anabasis one term; Greek prose composition, once a week during the 
spring term. While this course is a pre-collegiate requirement of 
classical students, it may be taken by graduates of approved high 
schools as college elective. Elective for scientific and literary stu- 
dents. Five hours a week for a year. 

b. Anabasis — Iliad. — Anabasis, for the first half year; Iliad, last 
half; Prose Composition, weekly first half. Prescribed and elective 
on same terms as Course a. Five hours a week for a year. Courses 
a and b are described more fully in work of the Academy. 

A. Freshman Greek. — Odyssey, three books: Selections, from 
Herodotus and Thucydides; Apology and part of Phaedo; Xenophon's 
Memorabilia or Greek Lyric Poets. In reading the Odyssey an 



Moobes Hill College Bulletin. 23 

effort is made to have the student catch the spirit and view-point of 
the age and writer that he may more fully appreciate and enjoy the 
charm of the poem. The History and Philosophy of Greece are 
carefully noted in connection with the prose authors of this course. 
Prescribed for classical, elective for literary students. Four hours a 
week for a year. 

B. Greek Drama. — Two terms are given to tragedy, three ot the 
following dramas being read, Prometheus Bound, Medea of Euripi- 
dides, Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannus, Agamemnon. In the spring 
term Aristophanes is read. The development of Greek Dramatic 
poetry, its function in the national life and its influences upon subse- 
quent literature are themes of study and investigation. Prescribed 
for classical students unless Latin B or C is taken, in which case it is 
elective. Elective for literary students. Four hours a week for a year. 

C. Greek Oratory — New Testament. — The first half of the year 
is given to the consideration of Greek oratory; Demosthenes De 
Corona is studied, with collateral reading of Lysias. During the last 
half of the year New Testament Greek is studied with some investi- 
gation of Hellenistic and Patristic Greek. Elective for classical and 
literary students. Four hours a week for a year. 

In General Greek B and C will not be offered the same year, but 
will alternate or be combined to meet the needs and desires of the 
class. 

III.— MODERN LANGUAGES 

Professor Ficken 

I. GERMAN 

a. Elementary German, — A careful study of the grammar, togeth- 
er with easy reading, much prose work, and some conversational 
exercise. Bacon's German Grammar is the text during the 
first and second terms; "Immense" is read in the third term in con- 
nection with prose work. This course is a pre-collegiate requirement 
for scientific and literary students. Freshmen, however, in the Sci- 
entific and Literary Courses, who have not presented German for 
admission, will be required to take the course, and will receive credit 
for it as college elective. Five hours a week for a year. 

b. Second Year German. — (i) Reading of German classics with 
attention to their literary value, lives of authors and grammatical 
points of interest. Lessing's "Minna von Barnhelm"; Schiller's "Wil- 
helm Tell"; and Goethe's "Hermann and Dorothea." (2) Scientific 
German. Blochmann's "Scientific German Reader" is the text, giving 
the student a brief history of the natural sciences and acquainting him 
with the German terms used in the same. 



24 Moorks Hill College Bulletin. 

Course (i) is taken in the first and third terms. Course (2) in 
the second term. Open to students who have had Course A. Pre- 
scribed and elective on same conditions as Course (a). Five hours a 
week for a year. 

A. German Classics. — Schiller's "Maria Stuart"; Lessing's "Nath- 
an der Weise"; study of German Literature based on Keller's "Bild- 
er aus der Deutschen Literatur". A continuation of the Scientific 
German of Course B. Prescribed for Freshmen in the Scientific 
Course. Elective for all other students who have had Course b. Four 
hours a week for a year. 

Note: — One course in German is prescribed for Sophomores in 
the Classical Course. This may be Course a, b, or A, according to 
previous preparation of the student. A three-hour credit is given. 

FRENCH 

A. Elementary French. — Studies in pronunciation and grammar 
with special attention to the verb; prose and easy reading. Fraser 
and Squair's "French Grammar" is the text and Rollin's reader 
is used. Prescribed for Freshmen in Scientific and Literary Courses. 
Elective in all other courses. Four hours a week for a year. 

B. Reading and Composition. — (1) A variety of literary work 
will be read. Merimee's "Colomba", Moliere's Comedies, extracts 
from Hugo's "Les Miserables," etc. (2) Scientific French. Herdler's 
reader is used. Course (1) is given during fall and spring terms and 
Course (2) during the winter term. Composition work and letter- 
writing during the year. The work is so arranged that the student 
may do second year reading one year and third year work the next, 
and vice versa. Prescribed for Sophomores in Sicentific and Literary 
Courses. Elective for all other students who have had course A. 
Four hours per week. 

IV.— ENGLISH AND HISTORY 
Professor Torbet 
Mr. Dashiell 
I. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

A. Rhetoric and Composition. — A course in theoretical and prac- 
tical composition. Special emphasis on themes. Prescribed for 
Freshmen in all courses. Two hours a week for a year. 

B. General Introduction to English Literature. — History of 
English Literature with studies in Spenser, Shakespeare, Words- 
worth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson and Browning. Collateral reading 
as prescribed by the instructor. Prescribed for Sophomores in all 
courses. Students below this grade will not be admitted to this 
course without the consent of the instructor. Three hours a week 
for a year. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 25 

C. English Prose. — Studies from the leading prose writers with 
pecial attention to style. Elective for students who have com- 
pleted Courses A and B. Two hours a week for a year. Offered in 
1909-10. 

D. Literary Criticism. — A study of the principles of criticism 
with pratical exercises in their application to the various literary 
forms. Elective for students who have completed Courses A and B. 
Two hours a week for a year. Offered in 1910-11. 

II. HISTORY 

A. History of England. — A study of the growth of the English 
nation, with special attention to the development of constitutional 
principles. Prescribed for Sophomores in all courses, and not open 
to students below this grade. Two hours a week for a year. 

B. American History, — A study of the history of our own 
country, with special attention to the formation and development of 
the constitution. Elective for students who have completed Course 
A. Two hours a week for a year. Offered in 1909-10. 

C. History of Modern Europe. — A brief survey of the media- 
eval period, followed by a careful study of the Modern Age. Elec- 
tive for students who have completed Course A. Two hours a week 
for a year. Offered in 1910-11. 

V— POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 
President Bovard 

The courses of study are designed to introduce the student to 
theoretical and applied phases of the subject. Fundamental princi- 
ples, practical problems, social conditions, discussion and debate of 
current social, economic and political questions relating to Pauper- 
ism, Charity, Crime and Penology, special attention being given to 
questions of Labor, Exchange, Money, Socialism, and Social Reform. 

International Law includes the comity of Christian and non- 
Christian nations, rights and privileges of states and their represen- 
tatives and citizens in foreign countries and laws respecting the high 
seas and armies of the world. 

The following courses are offered: A and B, or C, D and E, 
are prescribed for Seniors in the Classical and Literary Courses. 
Courses not taken as prescribed work are elective for all students. 
Courses C, D and E will be offered in 1909-10. Courses A and B will 
be offered in 1910-n. 

A. Sociology. — Four hours a week for the second term. 

B. Political Economy. — Four hours a week for the third term. 

C. International Law. — Four hours a week for the first term. 

D. Political Economy. — Four hours a week for the second term. 

E. Sociology. — Four hours a week for the third term. 



26 Moorbs Hill College Bulletin. 

VI. PHYSICAL SCIENCES 
Professor Bigney 
CHEMISTRY 

A. Inorganic Chemistry. — A thorough study is made of Oxygen, 
Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Carbon, Chlorine, Ammonia, Air, Water and 
the laws of chemical combination. Following this the Acids forming 
the Base-forming elements are considered in detail. The practical 
side of Chemistry is constantly kept in mind. -Prescribed for Sopho- 
mores in all courses. Two hours a week in recitation and four hours 
in the laboratory for the first and second terms. 

B. Qualitative Analysis.— Methods for the determination of 
metals and acids are taught by laboratory practice. Blowpipe Analy- 
sis forms a part of this course. Prescribed for Sophomores in Scien- 
tific Course. One recitation and eight hours in the laboratory for the 
third term. 

C. Organic Chemistry. — An elementary study in organic analy- 
sis and in preparation of leading organic compounds. Elective in all 
courses for students who have had Courses A and B. Two hours a 
week in recitation and five hours in laboratory for the first and second 
terms. 

D. Physiological Chemistry. — A study of the animal tissues, the 
vital processes of the human body, and some of the common diseases. 
Elective in all courses for those who have had Course C. Two hours 
a week in recitation and five hours in laboratory for the third term. 

II. PHYSICS 

A. Physics. — An advanced course in general physics to be given 
when the demand requires it. 

III. BIOLOGY 

A. Botany. — The flowering plants receive chief attention. The 
seeds, seedlings, roots, stems, leaves and flowers are carefully studied 
in recitation and laboratory, together with the physiological processes 
and ecological characteristics. In addition about twenty-five flowers 
are analyzed and described. Prescribed for Sophomores in all courses 
for the third term. A year'r course in college Botany will soon be 
introduced. 

B. Zoology. — This course is devoted to a consideration of the 
habits, morphology, physiology, reproduction and embryology of 
representative animals including both invertebrates and vertebrates. 
Methods of technique are taught, giving the student practice in the 
fundamentals of research work. The economic phase of Zoology 
receives careful attention. In the spring term bird study is empha- 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 27 

sized. The principles of organic evolution are also studied, and the 
history of Zoology presented. Prescribed for Juniors in the Scien- 
tific Course. Elective for other students. Two hours a week in reci- 
tation and four hours in the laboratory for the entire year. 

C. Histology and Physiology. — A study of the various tissues of 
the representative mammals and of the methods of staining, mount- 
ing, sectioning and the other methods of scientific investigation. The 
functions of these tissues and the various organs of the human body 
are considered. Two hours a week in recitation and four hours in 
the laboratory for the first and second terms. Elective in all courses. 

D. Embryology. — The study of the development of the frog is 
first taken up, then a more detailed study of the embryology of the 
chick. Two hours in recitation and four hours in the laboratory for 
the third term. Elective in all courses. Continuous with Course C. 

IV. GEOLOGY 

A. Geology. — The first six weeks is spent in the study of miner- 
alogy, the forms of crystals and the identification- of minerals by the 
blowpipe analysis. The remainder of the year is given to Dynam- 
ical, Structural, and Historical Geology. The study of specimens 
illustrating the geological principles constitutes an important feature 
of the work. Prescribed for Seniors in Scientific Course. Elective 
for other students. A year's course. 

V. ASTRONOMY 

A. Astronomy. — The fixed stars, the planets, moons, comets, 
meters, and nebulae are thoroughly studied. The location of the con- 
stellations receive special attention. This subject alternates with 
International Law. Offered in 1910-11. 

VI. BIOLOGICAL CLUB. 

The meetings are held bi-weekly. The students give lectures on 
special subjects mostly of a practical nature. Discussion is en- 
couraged. 

VII. MUSEUM 

The museum contains a large collection of specimens in Geology, 
Botany, Zoology, Physical Geography and Physiology well adapted 
to illustrate the scientific studies. Everything is used to illustrate the 
department. The museum is open to the public as visitors. 

VII.— MATHEMATICS 
Professor Smith 

As satisfactory work in the higher mathematics is dependent upon 
a thorough mastery of Elementary Algebra, all who have not taken 



28 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

this subject in the Academy or in a commissioned high school are 
strongly advised to review it thoroughly, preferably by taking it with 
us during the spring and summer terms, previous to entering the 
Freshman class in the. fall. 

A. Trigonometry and Surveying. — (i) Plane and Spherical 
Trigonometry. — The work in Plane Trigonometry will be exhaustive, 
dealing with the functions of angles and their relations, the develop- 
ment and manipulation of the more complex formulas and the solv- 
ing of the right and oblique triangle, with practical applications. In 
Spherical Trigonometry the student will be held to the development 
of the fundamental formulas, the interpretation of Napier's Analogies 
and Gauss's Equations, their application to the general triangle, and 
to both terrestial and celestial computations. Four hours a week 
during the first and second terms. 

(2.) Surveying. — Students are required to do actual work in sur- 
veying, triangulation and leveling. Four hours a week for the third 
term. 

Mathematics A is prescribed for Freshmen in all courses, except 
that surveying is optional for women. 

B. (1) College Algebra. — Entrance upon this year's work in 
mathematics usually indicates the student's intention to specialize 
along this line; so we preface it with a full term in a very strong text 
in advanced algebra. Chas. Smith's "College Algebra" is the text 
used at present, the class covering about half or two-thirds of this 
complete treatise, which prepares one most thoroughly for the higher 
mathematics. Prescribed for Sophomores in the Scientific Course. 
Four hours a week for the first term. 

(2) Analytical Geometry. — Conic Sections and their equations 
receive most attention. Work is also done in Solid Geometry. Pre- 
scribed for Sophomores in the Scientific Course. Elective for other 
students who have had Course A. Four hours a week for second and 
third terms. 

C. Calculus. — Differential Calculus is ofTered during the first two 
terms, and Integral Calculus during the third term. Elective in all 
courses for those who have had Course B. Four hours a week. 

VIII— PHILOSOPHY 
President Bovard 

Philosophy will predominate the mind of the truth seeker. Mind 
is the standard of the man. The History of Philosophy reveals its 
growth. Ideals rule the world. The object will be to discover doc- 
trines and trace the current of modern philosophic thought in the 
form of Sensationalism, Idealism, Scepticism, Mysticism, Rationalism 
and Realism. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 29 

In the scope of Psychology the physical basis of mental states 
and various theories are noted. The classification of function of 
mental faculties, the sensibilities and the will are presented in true 
psychological method. 

Metaphysics inquires into the nature and laws of reality. It be^ 
gins where the sciences leave off, accepting them as such and seeks 
an inner harmony of our conceptions with one another. To under- 
stand reality is the highest possibility of human thought. 

In Logic deductive and inductive methods are used for correct 
thinking and reasoning, and to note the sources of fallacy. 

The study of Ethics considers the foundation of moral obligation, 
the origin and content of moral law and conscience in all their rela- 
tions. 

The folowing courses are offered: A, B and C, or D, E and F, are 
prescribed for Juniors in the Classical Course; A and B, or D and E 
for Juniors in the Scientific and Literary Courses. Those who have 
completed A and D may elect any of the other courses not taken by 
them as prescribed work. Courses A, B and C will be offered in 
1909-10. Courses D, E and F will be offered in 1910-11. 

A. Psychology. — Four hours a week for the first term. 

B. History of Modern Philosophy. — Four hours a week for the 
second term. 

C. Logic. — Four hours a week for the third term. 

D. Psychology. — Four hours a week for the first term. 

E. Metaphysics. — Four hours a week for the second term. 

F. Ethics. — Four hours a week for the third term. 

IX. EDUCATION 

Professor Scott 

Miss Warder 

Mr. Brown 

The work of this department has been organized to meet the 
demands for professional training on the part of teachers in Classes 
"A" and "B", and to provide courses in education adapted to the 
needs of college students who expect to make teaching a lifework. 
The college is accredited for the above named classes and also offers 
a number of courses in addition to those required for teachers of 
these classes. Twenty-four hours from this department may be 
applied on a regular college course. 

In connection with this department or other departments of the 
College of Liberal Arts or Academy, classes are maintained for 
reviews in Arithmetic, Geography, United States History, English 



30 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

Grammar, Physiology, Nature Study, etc. These courses are so 
organized as to make it possible for the student to take one or more 
reviews during any term. Experienced teachers who wish to raise 
the grade of their license will find work in the common branches 
and other subjects of examination suited to their needs. 

The following professional courses are offered. Each course 
extends over a term and gives a four-hour credit: 

I. PSYCHOLOGY 

A. The work of this course will consist of a detailed study of the 
subject matter of Psychology, the relation of Psychology to the 
other branches of study and Elementary Pedagogy. A consideration 
of the principles that should aid teachers in the recitation and in 
discipline. 

B. In course B especial emphasis will be placed upon a careful 
study of the nature of knowing. This involves the stages of Pre- 
sentation, Representation, Understanding, Conception, Judgment, 
and Reasoning. 

C. This course will comprise a careful investigation of Feeling 
and Willing. It will be open to teachers who have had the preceding 
courses; also to teachers who belong in class "C." 

D. High School Pedagogy. A survey of the course of study 
for the high school and of the "Report of the Committee of Ten," is 
given. 

II. METHODS 

A. This course deals with education as to its nature; tfee school 
as an institution; the theories of mental activities; and general meth- 
ods. 

B. In course B the general conception of methods is applied 
to the branches of the course of study. Both courses presuppose 
the corresponding courses in Psychology. 

III. HISTORY OF EDUCATION 

A. A general view of the scope of Education together with a 
study of the types of the education of the oriental people will be 
given. Reference reading and reports are required in this work. 
Fall Term. 

B. The work of this term will comprise a study of the educa- 
tion of the Greeks as a people of liberal education, the Spartan cul- 
ture, the Athenian culture, the education, old and new, of the 
Romans. "Monroe's Source Book of History of Education". 
Winter Term. 

C. This term's work covers the education of the people of 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 31 

Europe as seen in the Renaissance, the Reformation, the growth of 
universities, and the rise of the school system. "Monroe's Source 
Book of the History of Education." Spring Term. 

D. A study of the school system of Germany, England and the 
United States will be given. Part of the term will be spent in a 
study of School Organization and Administration. Summer and 
Spring Terms. 

IV. OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE 

A. Regular work is offered throughout the year for which 
credit is given. The work will consist of observation of work done 
by critic teachers; discussion of the elements in the structure of 
lessons observed; assignment; reference work and discussion of 
work observed. 

B. Work is given in observation and in teaching. The aim of 
this course is to give the student skill in organizing and interpreting 
lessons and in presenting them. 

Course for Teachers of Class "A" 

Psychology — Course A. 
Methods — Course A. 
Observation and Practice — Course A. 

One term's work in any of the common branches or other sub- 
jects offered in the College. 

Vocal Music, Penmanship or drawing. 

Course for Teachers of Class "B" 

Psychology — Course B. 
Methods — Course B. 
Observation and Practice — Course B. 

One term's work in any of the common branches or other sub- 
jects offered in the College. 

Vocal Music, Penmanship or drawing. 

X. MUSIC 

Mrs. Williams 

Mr. Keller 

Recognizing the value of music as a culture study, the College 
permits candidates for a Bachelor's degree to elect work from the 
Department of music. Classical and scientific students may elect 
from courses offered in music the equivalent of three term hours; 
literary students may elect the equivalent of twelve term-hours. 



32 Moores Hill College' Bulletin. 

XL ART 

The following courses are offered: 

A. Freehand Drawing. — A study of perspective and work with 
pencil and brush in drawing objects, cast and nature. 

B. Public School Drawing. — Especially for teachers who are 
expected to teach drawing in schools. A study of the type forms, 
mechanical drawing of patterns and constructive designs. Work in 
decoration and designing. 

C. Painting. — Artistic designs decorated and ideals developed. 
Sketching from nature. 

XII. PUBLIC SPEAKING 
Mr. Keller 

Candidates for a Bachelor's degree may elect in elocution the 
equivalent of twelve term-hours. For description of course see 
Department of Public Speaking. 

XIII. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mr. Brown 

Miss Stevens 

Candidates for a Bachelor's Degree are required to complete 
during their Freshman and Sophomore years six hours in physical 
education. Two gymnasium periods a week for a term count as one 
hour. The following is a statement of the work offered. 

Instruction in Physical Education is given during the entire 
college course, personal attention being given to the individual needs 
of the students. The training is based upon the Delsarte Philosophy 
of Expression, supplemented by both the German and Swedish sys- 
tems of gymnastics. Exercises are given to secure symmetrical 
development of the body and to overcome such defects as incorrect 
poise, uneven or round shoulders, and any faults in the carriage of 
the body. The work for the first year includes dumb bells, wands, 
balls, breathing exercises, exercises for the purpose of overcoming 
stiffness, for developing control of the muscles, etc. Basketball also 
plays an important part in the gymnasium work. 

The work of the second year is an outgrowth of that of the first 
year. It aims to embrace more artistic work in harmony and spon- 
taneous expression. Indian clubs, basketball, and balls will be used; 
work in flexing and energizing will be given. 

The results expected from those who have had a full course in 
Physical Education, are: Ease, freedom and grace in standing and 
walking; freedom from self-consciousness; and ease and precision in 
all movements of the body. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 33 

On account of the increasing demand for a knowledge of Physi- 
cal Education, on the part of teachers, a class is organized 
especially for the Department of Education. The intention is to 
give the students a certain amount of drill in exercises which can be 
used in schools where appliances are not at hand. The bearing of 
these exercises upon the health, physique and bodily control is 
brought out during the entire course in physical training. 

Special attention is given to private pupils in this department. 
There is no physical deformity, however great, that cannot be over- 
come, either wholly or partially, by systematic, well directed practice, 
and to those suffering from curvature of the spine, weak lungs, unde- 
veloped voices, heart trouble, stooping shoulders, knock knees and 
the like, a thorough course in this department is recommended. 

Private classes for ladies and children will be organized at the 
beginning of each term. 

XIV. GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

Advanced courses of study adapted to the needs of graduate 
students are offered in most of the departments of the College. The 
work of graduate students is under the supervision of a standing 
committee of the Faculty. 
The following are the regulations pertaining to this department: 
Any person who has a Bachelor's degree in the College, or any 
other reputable school, may become a candidate for the correspond- 
ing Master's degree. 

2. Candidates for an advanced degree must register for their 
work before it is undertaken. The work itself may be done either in 
residence or in absentia. 

3. Application should be made to the Faculty within six weeks 
of the opening of any given year. Blank forms for application will 
be furnished upon application to the President or Registrar. 

4. The work required will be the equivalent of a year's study, 
forty-five hours. At least one-half of the work must be taken from a 
department of study in which the candidate has completed at least 
the undergraduate requirement in Moores Hill College or its equiva- 
lent. The rest of the work must be taken from not more than two 
departments. 

5. Candidates for a Bachelor's degree who during their under- 
graduate course devote their excess of time to such advanced studies 
as may be approved by the Committee on Graduate Study, may have 
such work credited towards a Master's degree. Such approval 
should be secured previous to taking up the studies. Otherwise the 
Committee will be under no obligation to accept the work as post- 
graduate credit. 



I 34 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

6. Resident candidates for the Master's degree may receive the 
same at the commencement following registration, non-resident can- 
didates not earlier than the second commencement after registration. 

7. The tuition for the Master's degree is twenty dollars. Five 
dollars is due upon matriculation and the balance when the degree 
is taken. A diploma fee of five dollars is charged. 

8. Any person who has received a Bachelor's degree in Moores 
Hill College, or in any other reputable school, may, upon the com- 
pletion of an additional year of study, receive a second Bachelor's 
degree. 

Moores Hill College offers no courses leading to the Ph. D. 
degree. 




ACADEMY 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The special work of the Academy is (i) to prepare young men 
and women for the College of Liberal Arts and (2) to furnish academ- 
ic training for those who cannot take a regular course, but wish to 
prepare themselves for professional study, for business, or for teach- 
ing in the public schools. 

The Academy is certified by the State Board of Education to do 
the work of commissioned high schools. Therefore our graduates 
from the Academy meet the requirements of the law which provides 
that all teachers entering the profession after August 1, 1908, shall 
be high school graduates. Students have all the advantages to be 
derived from the extensive apparatus, the laboratories, the library, 
the reading room, and the literary societies connected with the 
College of Liberal Arts. It is possible also for the student who so 
desires to take special courses in music, physical -culture and elocu- 
tion. 

Students in the Academy are under the direct instruction and 
care of the Faculty of the College of Liberal Arts. In case it be- 
comes necessary to employ undergraduate instructors, only those 
of marked ability will be engaged. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Candidates for admission to the Academy are expected to pre- 
sent evidences of good moral character. To begin the work of the 
first year students should have completed the common English 
branches. They should bring certificates of graduation from the 
eighth grade or of promotion to the high school. Students who do 
not have such certificates will usually be admitted without examina- 
tion to the class for which they seem to be prepared, but unsatis- 
factory work will subject the student to loss of rank. 

Candidates for advanced standing should present certificates 
showing the amount of work done, the time spent upon it, and the 
grade. Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the 
Registrar of the College. 

PRE-ACADEMIC CLASSES 

To meet the needs of students who are deficient in common 
branches, classes are formed in Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, 
etc. Every opportunity will be given the student in these classes 
to advance as rapidly as he may be able. 



36 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

NORMAL INSTRUCTION 

Special provision will be made for teachers and others who wish 
advanced work in the common branches. Classes will be maintain- 
ed in all branches required in the examination for license to teach. 
For the announcement of professional courses, see under Depart- 
ment of Education, page 29. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

The course of study extends through four years. Teachers and 
others who give satisfactory evidence of having done thoroughly a 
part of the work before entering will be credited with that work. 

Students of mature age, and those who show marked ability in 
their studies, will be permitted to complete their preparation as 
speedily as may be desired. In the majority of cases, however, the 
student will find the four years none too short a time in which to 
lay the foundations for his subsequent work. 

OUTLINE OF COURSE 

All classes in the Academy continue throughout the year unless 
otherwise specified. Five recitations per week in each subject are 
required. The letters following the subjects refer to the outline of 
courses as found on following pages of this catalogue. 

FIRST YEAR 

English (a) Grammar and Composition 

Latin (a) Beginning Latin 

Science 4 ,(a) Botany 

Mathematics (a) Algebra 

SECOND YEAR 

English (b) Rhetoric 

Latin (b) Caesar 

Mathematics (b) Algebra and Plane Geometry 

History (a) Ancient History 

THIRD YEAR 

Required work: 

English (c) American and English Literature 

Latin (c) Cicero 

Mathematics (c) Plane and Solid Geometry 

One of the following: 

History (b) Modern History 

Greek (a) Beginning Greek 

German (a) Beginning German 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



FOURTH YEAR 
Required work: 

English (d) Literature and Grammar 

Foreign Language: Latin (d), Greek (b), or German (b). 

Science (b) Physics 

One of the following: 

History (c) U. S. History and Civics 

Science (c) Physical Geography and Physiology 

A second foreign language. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Diplomas are awarded to those students who complete sixteen 
units of work, a year's work of daily recitations in one subject being 
the unit of measurement. The student is expected to take four sub- 
jects each year, and no student whose average grade is below 85 per 
cent, will be permitted to take more than four subjects. If more 
than sixteen units are completed, the excess m^y be offered as 
college credit. A diploma fee of one dollar is charged. 

The following more specific requirements and suggestions are 
made in order that the student may get che best results from his 
course: 

1. All candidates for a diploma must complete four years of 
English, four of foreign language, three of mathematics, one of his- 
tory, and two of science. 

2. Those who expect to take the Classical Course in the College 
should take four years of Latin and two of Greek; those who expect 
to take the Scientific Course should take the two years of German; 
and those who expect to take the Literary Course should include in 
their courses the two years of German and a second year of history. 

3. The student is expected to advise with the member of the 
Faculty designated as adviser for the Academy, and his choice of 
electives in the last two years is subiect to the approval of that 
officer under such regulations as may be established by the Faculty. 

ENGLISH 

English (a). — A review of the principles of English grammar. 
Elementary composition both oral and written; reading and study 
of representative selections from American and English authors. 
Stebbins' "A Progressive Course in English for Secondary Schools." 

English (b). — A continuation of English (a), with special atten- 
tion to theme writing. An average of at least one exercise a week 
throughout the year is given to the study of such masterpieces as 
Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice," Hawthtorne's "The House of 



38 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

Seven Gables," Eliot's "Silas Marner" and Milton's "Minor Poems." 
English (c). — During the first two terms of the third year, 

American literature is studied. In the third term English literary 

history is taken up with a study of masterpieces. Throughout the 

year theme work is required. 

English (d). — The first two terms are a continuation of English 

(c). In connection with literary history, a number of the college 

entrance requirements are itaken up, together with representative 

selections.. 

In the third term a course in advanced English grammar is 

given. The object of the course is to give a thorough review of the 

principles of English grammar. 

LATIN AND GREEK 

Three objects are kept in view in the Academy Latin and Greek. 
First, to give that mental training for which these languages are pre- 
eminently adapted. Second, to lay such a thorough foundation that 
the student can read his college classics with an appreciation of 
their literary values as world masterpieces. Third, to help him 
acquire correctness and proficiency in the use of the English 
language and a better understanding of its literature To this end 
constant emphasis is put upon choice wording in translation, while 
comparisons are made with similar English productions and English 
derivatives are noted. 

LATIN 

Four years of Latin, five recitations a week are taught in the 
Academy, of which three are prescribed for all students, and four 
should be taken by those electing classical work. 

Latin (a). — Collier and Daniell's "First Year Latin" is studied 
throughout the year. Frequent reviews and constant drill in the 
forms gone over are given. The last few weeks are spent in reading 
the Roman History and other connected matter included in the 
book. 

Latin (b). — Selections from "Caesar's Gallic War," in amount 
from four to five books. Constant drill in form and syntax and 
systematic study of Latin Grammar are kept up throughout the 
year. Prose Composition is studied in three ways. First by pre- 
pared written exercises, once a week, second by frequent oral exer- 
cises and third by the class writing Latin sentences at the dictation 
of the teacher from the lesson text as a basis; the total amount of 
Trose being equivalent to two exercises a week throughout the year. 

Latin (c). — Six orations of Cicero and from fifteen to twenty of 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 39 

his letters are read. Thorough drill in form and syntax is kept up 
and increasing emphasis is laid upon the literary and historical value 
of the matter read. Sallust's "Catiline" or Selections from "Ovid" 
may be substituted for two of the orations. Prose Composition is 
continued weekly throughout the year. 

Latin (d) — Six books of Virgils "Aeneid" are read. Much atten- 
tion is given to the metrical reading, the literary features and the 
mythology of the poem. Selections from the Eclogues or from 
Catullus' poems may be substituted for the fifth book of the Aeneid. 
Practice in sight reading is given throughout courses (b), (c) and 
(d). 

GREEK 

Two years of Greek should be in the Academy taken by those 
electing classical work. But students who are graduates of approved 
high school or the Academy will be admitted to the Freshman 
class and allowed to take this Greek as college elective. 

Greek (a). — During the first two terms a beginning Greek book 
is studied. In the third term Xenophon's "Anabasis" is read with 
weekly exercises in Greek Prose Composition. 

Greek (b). — The Anabasis and Prose Composition are continued 
during the first half of the second year. From three to four books 
of the Anabasis are read with constant drill and continuous review of 
form and syntax. The last half of the second year is spent on the 
"Iliad." Homeric form and meter are studied and peculiarities of style 
carefully noted. Selections from different books in amount from 
1500 to 2000 lines are read. 

Goodwin's "Greek Grammar," Harper and Wallace's "Anabasis," 
"Pearson's Greek Prose Composition," "Seymour's Iliad." 

GERMAN 

German (a). — A careful study of the grammar with special atten- 
tion to pronunciation. Easy reading is taken up with the beginning 
of the grammar work. Drill in prose work throughout the year and 
some conversational exercise. Bacon's "German Grammar" is the 
text. During the third term Storm's "Immensee" is read in conjunction 
with the prose work. The purpose of this course is to equip the 
student with a thorough knowledge of the grammar. 

German (b). — (1). Reading of German classics with attention 
to their literary value, lives of authors, and grammatical points of 
interest. Schiller's "Wilhelm Tell," Goethe's "Hermann und Doro- 
thea," Lessing's "Minna von Barnhelm," are read. (2) Scientific 
German. Blockmann's "Scientific German Reader" is the text. 



40 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

Course (i) is given during the fall and spring terms. 
Course (2) during the winter term. 
Conversational Exercises throughout the year. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics (a). — 1. Pre-Algebraic Arithmetic. — Consisting of 
(i)such drill work in the fundamentals as will acquaint the student 
with many practical short methods in making arithmetical computa- 
tions, so as to eliminate the drudgery and leave only the beauties and 
delights of number manipulations; (2) general solutions of arith- 
metical problems in which the principle and the relation of the quanti- 
ties involved will be the important features, the numerical answer 
being of little consequence; (3) the use of the equation in arithmetic. 
This course is intended to get students ready for work in Algebra, 
i. e., processes in general numbers, but it ought also to make the 
difficult parts of arithmetic easy and attractive. First term. 

2. Algebra. — Wells' Algebra, or its equivalent, to Fractions. 
Second term. 

3. Algebra. — Wells, or its equivalent, to Involution. Third term. 
Mathematics (b). 1. Algebra. — Wells, or its equivalent to hasty 
review of factoring, and Simultaneous Equatio-ns of first degree. In- 
volution, Evolution, Fractional Exponents, Imaginaries, to Simulta- 
neous Equations of second or higher degree. First term. 

2. Algebra. — Wells or its equivalent. Simultaneous Equations 
of higher degrees, Proportion, Progression, Undetermined Coeffic- 
ients, Binominal Theorem, and Logarithms. Completion of Begin- 
ning Algebra. Second term. 

3. Plane Geometry. — Books I and II of Wells' Geometry, or its 
equivalent. Third term. 

Mathematics (c). — 1. Plane Geometry. — Thorough Review of 
Books I and II. and Book III in addition to this. First term. 

2. Plane Geometry. — Completion of Plane Geometry. Second 
term. 

3. Solid Geometry. — Completion of Solid Geometry. Third term. 

HISTORY 

History (a). — A year's work is offered in Ancient History with 
special emphasis upon Greek and Roman History. Much general 
reading and the drawing of maps illustrative of the text are required. 
Morey's "Outline of Ancient History" and the "Ivanhoe Historical 
Note Book Series." 

History (b). — A year's work in Modern History. The course 
is a continuation of History (a), with the same requirements as to 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 41 

i 

reading and map-reading. Special attention will be given to English 
History and to such other portions of European history as will pre- 
pare the student for advanced work in American history. 

History (c). — A thorough study of American History, based on 
such texts as Montgomery's "Student's American History," Fisk, 
Channing, Johnson, and McMaster. A part of the year is given to 
a study of municipal, county, state, and federal government. Fisk's 
"Civil Government" is used as a text. 

SCIENCE 

Science (a). — Botany. A year's course of high school grade 
including the Thallophytes, Bryophytes, Pteridophytes, and the Sper- 
matophytes. The students are taught the use of the compound 
microscope and are required to make drawings of structures 
observed. The course is made as practical as possible. 

Science (b) — Physics. The fundamental principles of the sub- 
jects are taught in class room and laboratory. Every effort is made 
to make clear the truths of physics and show how these are made 
use of by man. A year's course is given. 

Science (c). — Physical Geography is presented during the first 
and second terms. All the necessary apparatus and the specimens in 
the Museum are freely used to illustrate the subject. In the third 
term Physiology and Scientific Temperance is taken up and treated 
in a scientific and practical way with special emphasis on all ques- 
tions pertaining to the health of the people. 




Department of Music 



Mrs. Williams, Pianoforte 
Mr. Keller, Voice 
I. PIANOFORTE 

The courses of study here prescribed, are for earnest students 
who want to attain real excellence; and as very many have in mind 
the work of teaching, their needs have been especially provided for. 
The number of successful teachers who have received their train- 
ing at Moores Hill College, attest the thoroughness and broadness 
of the courses. A careful study of the requirements and capabilities 
of each pupil is made, a thorough training in the fundamental prin- 
ciples of technique is given and enthusiastic musicians as well as 
finished artists are developed. 

The studies named indicate the range of difficulty belonging to 
the several grades, but it is obvious that lists of pieces sufficient to 
illustrate a wide range of musical literature cannot here be given. 

The time needed for the completion of each grade will average 
not less than a year. Often more time should be taken, especially 
if college studies are pursued at the same time. 

Recitals are held once in three weeks, in which all pupils partici- 
pate. These furnish incentive to study and experience in public 
performances. 

The following is an outline of the course of study for the Piano- 
forte: 

First Grade (Preparatory) — Gurlitt, opus. 117; Loeschhorn, op. 
65 Book 1; Kohler, op. 151. Technical exercises throughout the 
course. 

Second Grade. — Kohler, op. 50; Loeschhorn, op. 65; Books 2 and 
3;Czerny, op. 636; First Studies in Bach. Easy pieces, and sonatinas 
by Clementi, Kuhlau, Dussek, etc. 

Third Grade. — Loeschhorn, op. 66, Book 1 and 2; Heller selec- 
tions from op. 47, 46 and 45; Kohler, op. 128, Book 1; Gurlitt, op. 142 

the Trill. 

School of Octives; Jensen, op. 32; Bach Preludes, Sonatas of Haydn 
Fourth Grade. — Loeschhorn, op. 66, Book 3; Doring's op. 24 
School of Octaves; Jensen, op 32; Bach's Preludes, Sonatas of Haydn 
and Mozart and pieces by modern composers. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 43 

Fifth Grade. — Cramer's Etudes (Bulow Ed); Bach's Inventions, 
Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words; Sonatas by Mozart and 
Beethoven; Selections from Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, etc. Ele- 
ments of Harmony. Elson's Theory of Music one hour per week, 
free. 

Sixth Grade. — Kullak's Octave School, Book 2; Clementi's 
Gradus ad Parnassum; Chopin, op. 10; Selections appropriate to this 
grade from Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Bach, Weber and 
others. History of Music, one hour per week, one year free. 

A musical education should also comprise as much literary work 
as is now done in high schools, and a college course is recommended 
to all who can attain it. Herein lies the advantage of studying music 
in a school where art, literature and science are blended. Here it 
is taught that music is the peer of any branch of human knowledge, 
but that no single line of study is sufficient for complete scholarship. 

Students who complete the course of study as outlined above 
and take in addition to their work in music, the following courses 
from the Academy and the College of Liberal Arts will receive a 
diploma: 

First Year: English (a); Latin (a); Physical Culture. 

Second Year: English (b); History (a), Physical Culture. 

Third Year: English (c); History (b). 

Fourth Year: English (d) ; German (a). 

Fifth Year: English (B) or History (A). 

Those who, in addition to completing the course in music, have 
received a Bachelor's degree from the College of Liberal Arts, 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Music. 

II VOICE CULTURE 

This department aims to aid nature by correct, pure vowels and 
deep, natural breathing, in building up a full, rich and well rounded 
voice. 

Careful attention is given to the following points: 

(1.) Correct and deep breathing. 

(2.) Free, relaxed and easy position of the body and throat. 

(3.) Natural, relaxed position of the tongue, lower jaw and 
larynx. 

(4.) Production of tone by careful and free direction of the 
breath in such a way as to completely fill all the cavities of reson- 
ance provided by nature. 

A Choral Class is organized each term. Only music of the high- 
est grade is studied. The class meets once a week. Credit for this 
work is given on the collegiate courses. All students who can sing 
are admitted. A small fee is charged each term for this work. 



44 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

In the spring term a normal class in sight reading and public 
school music is organized. The fee for this work is one dollar per 
term. 

A student in voice who wishes to obtain a diploma must have 
completed all the literary work required of students in instrumental 
music. The course must consist of at least three years' work in 
voice, two lessons a week during each term of the three years. The 
student must have completed the courses in Theory and History of 
Music. 

The first year is spent in elementary studies and simple ballads. 

Second year — more advanced studies. Sieber, Conconne, Tosti 
and others. Songs of greater difficulty. 

Third year — more advanced studies, oratorio and operatic songs. 

A pupil will advance only at the judgment of the teacher and 
will receive a diploma only when the teacher is satisfied that he is 
entitled to it and has done the work satisfactorily. 

For tuition charges for courses in music, see schedule of prices 
on page 14. 

Note. — Only the literary subjects indicated above will be given 
music and elocution students without additional charge. Should other 
subjects be elected from the literary department, the usual charge for 
special instruction will be made. As many as three regular subjects 
in the literary department make one a matriculant in that department 
and subject to the full college tuition as well as music tuition. 

Department of Public Speaking 

Mr. Keller 

The aim of the work in this department is to enable the student 
to be natural in reading; to enable him to interpret the common and 
didactic styles in reading with ease; to master the qualities necessary 
for effective public speaking. 

Students are taught the principles of vocal culture applied to 
the natural voice, voice building, the application of gesture and the 
like. The work of the first year is: 

(1.) To secure a refined pronunciation of English words. 

(2.) To secure distinct utterance. 

(3.) To secure perfect naturalness in common reading. 

The work of the second year is a continuation of the first year's 
work, special attention being paid to the reading and interpretation 
•f Browning, Shakespeare, Tennyson and other writers. 

All candidates for a diploma from this department must take two 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 45 

lessons a week each term of the two years. They must complete in 
addition the literary work that is required of music students. 

Recitals are held frequently and students are required to partici- 
pate. 

Class work will be organized if occasion requires it. All young 
men studying for the ministry should make a special effort to take 
this work. 

A class in Delsarte movements will be organized during the year, 
running through one or more terms. A fee of $3.00 per term will be 
charged to those who wish to take this work and are not enrolled as 
students in the department of Public Speaking. This work is free to 
all regular students in this department. 

For tuition charges, see schedule of prices, page 14. 

Commercial Department 

Miss Brooks 

The following courses are offered: 

1. Shorthand. — It requires from six to nine months to complete 
this course, according to the ability and previous educational advan- 
tages of the student. The Benn Pitman system, the best known and 
most generally used system in America, is taught. 

2. Typewriting. — This study is taken in connection wifth shorthand. 
With daily practice of an hour the student may acquire such pro- 
ficiency as will enable him to meet all reasonable demands. 

3. Book-Keeping. — The course is based upon clear definitions, 
practical illustrations and modern methods. Eight complete sets 
are worked out. Each is taken up and studied in its entirety, so that 
a connected view may be obtained in the opening of books, the 
journalizing, posting and closing accounts. 

4. Commercial Arithmetic. — The course includes a study of 
banking, percentage, trade discounts, stocks and bonds, exchange, 
loss and gain. 

A certificate is granted to those who complete the course in a 
satisfactory manner. 

For tuition in this department see schedule of prices on page 14. 



Degrees Conferred by the College 

1908 

(In Cursu) 
Master of Arts 

Armacost, Harlae E Piqua. O. 

Ward, Frank B Oakland, 111. 

Winkley, John W Auburn, Cal. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Gullette, Ruby Merle Paintsville, Ky. 

Harris, Tyson New Salem 

Smith, Greta Cincinnati, O. 

Wallace, Kirk Earle Canton, O. 

Westhafer, Clara Anna Upland 

Bachelor of Science 

Dashiell, John Frederick Fairland 

Elwyn, Opal Delaware 

Tasker, Harriet Alice Cincinnati, O. 

Music Diploma 
Mulford, Carrie Moores Hill 

Academic Diploma 

Ake, Howard Moores Hill 

Michael, Clem O Terre Haute 

Thompson, Harry Versailles 

Normal Diploma 

Brown, Ernest R Corydon 

Gibson, Freda Marie Newcastle 

Henderson, Helen Versailles 

Hooper, Oris Dillsboro 

Miller, Elizabeth Aurora 

Roberts, Harriet Versailles 

Winkley, Ora Aurora 

(Pro Honore) 
Master of Arts 

Pitkin, A. H Columbus 

Turner, Herbert B Lintore 

Tarbox, Gamaliel S Areola 111. 

Doctor of Divinity 

Bovard, Charles L Oxford, O 

Vayhinger, Monroe Upland 

Doctor of Science 
Hargitt, Chaiies W Syracuse, N. Y. 



STUDENTS 



Candidates for Diplomas and Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts 

Hillman, Gail Greensburg 

McCallie, Nelle % Columbus 

Muir, Charles W Fairland 

Taggart, Ethel Charlestown 

Whitsitt, Virgil Vest Deputy 

Bachelor of Literature 

Dashiell, John Frederick Fairland 

Bachelor of Science 

Roads, Katie M Hillsboro, O. 

Smith, Clara Beatrice Milan 

Ward, Ada Leora Moores Hill 

Ward, Archibald B Rising Sun 

Diploma in Music — Piano 

Baker, Blanche Moores Hill 

Edwards, Ruth Elizabeth Moores Hill 

Warner, Alma Moores Hill 

Whitsitt, Culla Deputy 

Diploma in Public Speaking 
Sanders, Ara E Moores Hili 

Normal Diploma 

Lewis, Florence t Moores Hill 

Runyam, Mae North Vernon 

Shuter, Harry R Moores Hill 

Sinnett, Pearl North Vernon 

Sullivan, Mabel Butlerville 

Classification of Students 

NOTE— The letter "c" indicates the Classical Course, "s" the Scientific Course and "1" the 

Literary Course. 



Senior Class 

Dashiell, J. Fred, 1 Fairland 

Fi illman, Gail Josephine, c Greensburg 

McCallie, Nelle, c Columbus 

Muir, Charles W., c Fairland 

Roads, Katie, M. s Hillsboro, O. 

Smith, Clara Beatrice, s Milan 

Taggart, Ethel, c Charlestown 



48 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

Ward, Ada Leora, s Moores Hill 

Ward, Archibald B., s Rising Sun 

Ward, Ada Lora, s Moores Hill 

Whitsitt, Virgil Vest, c Deputy 

Junior Class 

Bellamy, Raymond, c Moores Hill 

Broadwell, Herbert A., c Patriot 

Cissna, William Everett, 1 Moores Hil! 

Elwyn, Ruby, 1 Delaware 

Foster, Adelaide Beryl, s Deputy 

Martin, Anna Elizabeth, c Aurora 

McAnally, Floy, c Hymera 

Miller, Eva B., 1 Moores Hill 

Remark, Robert R., s Moores Hill 

Smith, Charles Emory, s Moores Hill 

Taylor, Francesca Bellamy, c Moores Hill 

Vayhinger, Ira D., 1 Delaware 

Sophomore Class 

Brooks, Laura C, 1 Moores Hill 

Brown, Ernest R., s Corydon 

Cottingham, Walter C, s Moores Hill 

Hester, Paul Vincent, 1 Homestead 

Knowles, Sylvia, 1 Moores Hill 

Patrick, Willard Chester, c Shelbyville 

Valentine, Roy H. c Moores Hill 

Freshman Class 

Ake, William Howard, c Moores Hill 

Conway, John J., s Fenton, Mich. 

Conway, G. Lemuel, 1 Moores Hill 

Dashiell, Leland E., s Fairland 

Doles,Lillian Maude, 1 Greensburg 

Dashiell, Leland E., s Fairland 

Francis, George Emerson, s Auburndale, Mass. 

Guard, Willard, s North Bend, O. 

Hester, Lawrence Olin Hans, 1 Homestead 

Homer, Harry Alvin Penney, s Everett, Mass. 

Howk, Hannah Lee, c Rockport 

McMullen, Ethel, 1 Milan 

McQueen, Glenna Endell, 1 Moores Hill 

Niles, Walter B., 1 Chrisney 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 49 

North, William G., s Patriot 

Smith. Florence E., 1 Moores Hill 

Ward, Harley L., 1 Moores Hill 

Specials 

Godwin, J. S Moores Hill 

Knowles, Amos E. (Botany) Moores Hill 

Warder, Sara Cord (English) Jeffersonville 

Sanders, Grace Moores Hili 

Department of Education 



Class C 



Dugle, Clarence Rising Sun 

McCoy, Daily K .' Milan 

Mundy, Alta M .' Dabney 

Newman, O. L Delaware 

Class B 

Ake, George McMakin Milan 

Budd, Myrtle. , Vernon 

Fagley, Walter Stone Bethel, O. 

Graves, Iva Nabb 

Henderson, Pearl V Otisco 

Lingo, S. A Milan 

McMillan, Howard N Medora 

Pate, Mary Dillsboro 

Prentice, Walter Earl Memphis 

Runyan, Mae North Vernon 

Schultz, Dora C Moores Hill 

Sinnett, Pearl North Vernon 

Sullivan, Mable Catherine Butlerville 

Twineham, Mac Versailles 

VanOsdol, Chester C Holton 

Williams, Virgil Pearl Aurora 

Class A 

Allen, Mable Brownstown 

Anthony, Earl Rupert Clarksburg 

Boner, Charlotte Irene Vernon 

Beer, Florence Edna Versailles 



50 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

Bridges, Cecil Leland Crothersville 

Cooper, Thomas A Rising Sun 

Cooper, Thomas H Rising Sun 

Cordano, Nettie Cincinnati, O. 

Garrigues, Meda Sunman 

Gerrard, William Milan 

Hartman, Ethel Charlestown 

Hargitt, Charles Lee Medora 

Howk, Hannah Lee i Rockport 

Kelley, Daisy Elizabeth Milroy 

Kirk, Naomi J Otisco 

Ludwig, Elsie Lawrenceburg 

Michael, Curtis B Jasonville 

Moser, Mary Jeffersonville 

Parkins, Miriam Milton 

Tyrrell, Fayette Versailles 

Tyrrell, Mabel Versailles 

Tucker, Nellie B Milan 

Nicholson, Olena Medora 

Nelson, Lowe Rising Sun 

Shafer, Edna A Alert 

Stewart, Lillian Anderson Versailles 

Van Campen, Ethel Jeffersonville 

Walters, Harry Edwin Clarksburg 

Wilber, Julia Hartford 

Wilson, Walter Milan 

Williams, Lolo Jeffersonville 

Academy 

Fourth Year 

Ake, George Milan 

Arthur, Kyle Delaware 

Bovard, Gilbert S Moores Hill 

Canfield, Ethel L Moores Hill 

Edwards, John F Moores Hill 

Godwin, J. S Moores Hill 

Huffer, Weldon Hope 

Holtegel, Floyd C Moores Hill 

Koenigkramer, Walter Capron, Okla. 

Knowles, Birdie Leona Moores Hill 

Lewis, Florence Cincinnati, O. 

Mahler, W. Edgar Sunman 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 51 

Farmer, John Forest Batesville 

Risinger, Katie Mae Delaware 

Sheldon, Temple S Osgood 

Shuter, Harry R Aurora 

Smith, Leslie Moores Hill 

Smith, Claude Moores Hill 

Tobias, Elsie L Malinta, O. 

Walker, Raymond Moores Hill 

Third Year 

Bigney Leslie Moores Hill 

Brooks, Elizabeth Moores Hill 

Fruchtnicht, Emma M Osgood 

Rockafellow, Beulah Moores Hill 

Rockafellow, Mary Jane Moores Hill 

Second Year 

Bigney, Alfra Lemuel '..... Moores Hill 

Bovard, Charles Burton Moores Hill 

Bowers, Millard Moores Hill 

Burlingame, Frank Stewart Moores Hill 

Faris, Golden Wesley Indian Springs 

Fisher, W. E Deputy 

Click, Harry R Hope 

Hallawell, Alice Milan 

Lamb, Lee Moores Hill 

Leininger, Forrest Moores Hill 

Leininger, Freeman Moores Hill 

Lingo, John Wesley Milan 

Mitchell, Ray Indian Springs 

Newman, Horace Holton 

Robertson, Merrill Hoyt Deputy 

Shilling, Leo Moores Hill 

Scripture, Ina Moores Hill 

Smith, Augustus Moores Hill 

Smith, Clarence Moores Hill 

Spencer, Ella Ruth Milan 

Stevens, Helen Alice Moores Hill 

Stevens, Ruth Francis Moores Hill 

Todd, John D Aurora 

Wenzel, Clarence Moores Hill 

Whitsitt, Carl : Deputy 

Whitsitt, Carney A Franklin 



52 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

First Year 

Allen, Waldron Emerson Moores Hill 

Barkley, Lawrence Moores Hilt 

Brown, Zella Corydon 

Burlingame, Olive Dorothy Moores Hill 

Campbell, Earl Sugar Branch 

Carnes, Myrtle French Lick 

Chastine, Alfred Ernest Moores Hill 

Churchill, Fern Moores Hill 

Churchill, Vera Moores Hill 

Craven, Clarence Charles Moores Hill 

Craven, Edith May Moores Hill 

Francham, Gladys Indianapolis 

Givan, Frank Moores Hill 

Glass, Lucille Moores Hill 

Henschen, Walter Dillsboro 

Huddleston, Raymond L Guilford 

Kenan, William Earl Moores Hill 

McMullen, Otis Milan 

McQueen, Lyman Moores Hill 

Mitchell, Earl H Shoals 

Mosmeier, Alice Ruth Spades 

Mulford, Mildred Moores Flill 

Rice, Bessie Moores Hill 

Rumsey, William Milan 

Sanders, Gilbert Haven Moores Hill 

Seymour, Tracie C Bennington 

Smith, Mrs. Claud Moores Hill 

Smith, Esther Carolyne Moores Hill 

Sutton, Earl , Lawrenceburg 

Turner, Roy Dillsboro 

Valentine, Angeline Moores Hill 

Ward, Ida Rising Sun 

Washburn, Jesse Moores Hill 

Wenzel, Clarence Moores Hill 

Wright, Stella Olcott Moores Hill 

Music Department 

Piano 

Ake, Mrs. W. H Moores Hill 

Baker, Blanche, (Senior) Moores Hill 

Bigney, Edna Moores Hill 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 53 

Bonham, Alta Harrison, O. 

Bovard, Alice May Moores Hill 

Bovard, Fressie Paris 

Bowers, Florence Moores Hill 

Doles, Ethel May Greensburg 

Edwards, Ruth E. (Senior) Moores Hill 

Ford, Alda Hazelton 

French, Bessie Moores Hill 

Guard, Eunice North Bend, O. 

Howk, Bea Rockport 

McAnally, Floy Hymera 

McNeelan, Goldie Holton 

Moselley, Ina Moores Hill 

Mulford, Mildred Moores Hill 

Newman, Orpha Delaware 

Pate, Flora Rising Sun 

Risinger, Katie Mae - Delaware 

Sanders, Gertrude Moores Hill 

Shockley, Pauline Heistand Milan 

Smith, Esther Moores Hill 

Smith, Florence Moores Hill 

Smith Gussie Moores Hill 

Tanner, Isabelle Milan 

Templeton, Luna Greensburg 

Taylor, Francesca Moores Hill 

Voshell, Florence Aurora 

Warner, Alma, (Senior) Moores Hil! 

Watson, Ethel Greensburg 

Whitsitt, Culla C., (Senior) Deputy 



Voice 

Brooks, Elizabeth Moores Hill 

Brooks, Laura Moores Hill 

Daughters, Ethel Moores Hill 

Doles, Ethel Greensburg 

Fagley, Susan Grace Moores Hill 

Ficken, Oscar R Moores Hill 

I'isher, Norman Delaware 

Rockafellow, Mary Jane Moores Hill 

Stevens, Belle Moores Hill 

Tyrrell, Fayette Versailles 

Tyrrell, Mabel Versailles 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



Public School Music 

Beer, Florence Edna Versailles 

Boner, Charlotte Irene Vernon 

Bridges, Leland Crothersville 

Brooks, Laura Moores Hill 

Garrigues, Meda Sunman 

Hartman, Ethel Charleston 

Henderson, Pearl V Otisco 

Rice, Bessie Moores Hilt 

Risinger, Katie Delaware 

Sanders, Ara Moores Hill 

Schultz, Dora Moores Hill 

Stewart, Lillian A Versailles 

Tyrrell, Fayette Versailles 

Ward, Mrs. Ida Rising Sim 

Moores Hill College Band 

Director, W. E. Cissna 

Solo Cornet, W. E. Cissna 

E Flat Cornet, W. F. Guard 

ist. B Fiat Cornet, Augustus Smith 

2nd. B Flat Cornet, Clarence Smith 

E Flat Clarinet, W. B. Niles 

Solo Alto, L. E. Dashieh 

ist. Alto, Floyd Holtegel 

2nd. Alto, W. G. North 

Solo Trombone, Gilbert S. Bovard 

2nd. Trombone, Harley L. Ward 

Baritone, . . Lawrence O. Hester 

Tuba, E. R. Brown 

Bass Drum, Ray Bellamy 

Snare Drum, Burton Bovard 

Department of Public Speaking 

Adkins, Mary Elizabeth Moores Hill 

Ake, William Howard Moores Hill 

Cissna, William E. Moores Hill 

French, Bessie Moores Hill 

Larkin, Elizabeth Rockport 

Pate, Flora Rising Sun 

Sanders, Ara ■ Moores Hill 

Whitsitt, Virgil Deputy 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 55 

Post- Graduate 

Warner, Anna — (English) Moores Hill 

Specials 

Bellamy, Raymond Moores Hill 

Brooks. Laura Moores Hill 

Edwards, Ruth Moores Hill 

Foster, Adelaide Deputy 

Hester, Paul V Homestead 

Howk, Bea Moores Hill 

Knowles, Sylvia Moores Hill 

Martin, Anna Elizabeth Aurora 

Moore, Ruth Moores Hill 

Patrick, Willard Shelbyville 

Smith, Clara B Milan 

Vayhinger, Ira D Delaware 

Webb, Margaret Moores Hill 

Business Department 

Book-Keeping 

Butler, Viola Lawrenceburg 

Pate, Flora M Rising Sun 

Shorthand 

Bowers, Florence Moores Hill 

Butler, Viola Lawrenceburg 

Francham, Gladys Indianapolis 

Specials in Physical Culture 

Ake, Mrs. Howard Moores Hill 

Howk, Mrs. Anna Moores Hill 

Knowles, Mrs. A. E Moores Hill 

Smith, Mrs. Sadie Moores Hill 

Williams, E. Louise Moores Hill 

Students in Summer School 

Barricklow, Lucy Aurora 

Bielby, Hazel Lawrenceburg 

Brooks, Laura Cole Moores Hill 

Burlingame, Frank Stuart Moores Hill 



56 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

Cissna, William Everett Moores Hill 

Cotton, Nora Edith Moores Hill 

Cox, Marie Holton 

Craven, Bertha Tell Indianapolis 

Cravens, Ella Holton 

Cross, Ralph R Delaware 

Dashiell, Fred Fairland 

Daugherty, E. A Moores Hill 

Edwards, John Moores Hill 

Emerson, Fayette Hollis Lawrenceburg 

Fagley, Walter Stone Bethel, O. 

Fagley, Susan Grace Moores Hill 

Fisher, W. E Deputy 

Fletcher, Charles W Moores Hill 

Fruchtnicht, Emma Mary Osgood 

Gault, Carrie Delaware 

Gault, Emma Delaware 

Gelvin, Harry F Belle Fourche, S. D. 

Gibbs, C. P Vallonia 

Gibbs, Mrs. Commodore Vallonia 

Gilmore, Jennie Mollie Moores Hill 

Gullette, Elaine Denver, Colo. 

Hester, Lawrence Homestead 

Hester, Paul V Homestead 

Hinman, Effie Patriot 

Hogan, A. F Moores Hill 

Hooper, Oris Dillsboro 

Jobst, Lucinda Sherldon Aurora 

Kerrigan, Row Lee Aurora 

Kimmel, Gertrude Lawrenceburg 

Kirk, Naomi J Otisco 

Knowles, Amos E Moores Hill 

Koenigkramer, Walter E New Point 

Lapp, Emma Wirt 

Lazenbyjohn C Vallonia 

Liston, Harriet Jeffersonville 

Maxam, Corliss Francisco 

McHenry, Mary Pearl Aurora 

McKittrick, Ethel Clare Milan 

Miller. Maud Dillsboro 

Mitchell, Ray . Indian Springs 

Newman, Mary A Delaware 

Newman, Otho L Delaware 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 57 

Nowlin, Mabel Elizabeth Lawrenceburg 

Overturf, Lucille Holton 

Fate, Mary Lillian Dillsboro 

Rader, Helen Banes Aurora 

Remark, Robert R Moores Hill 

Reynolds, Josephine Butlerville 

Rice, Bessie Moores Hill 

Risinger, Katie Mae Delaware 

Roudebush, John A Lawrenceburg 

Sage, Margaret Osgood 

Schilling, Madeline Moores Hill 

Schleicher, Anna Elizabeth Lawrenceburg 

Scripture, Ina Moores Hill 

Siekerman, Clyde H Dillsboro 

Siekerman, Pearl Dillsboro 

Sinnett, Pearl North Vernon 

Sheldon, Temple Osgood 

Smith, Clara Beatrice ... Milan 

Smith, Florence E Moores Hill 

Smith, Rhoda Aldora Harrison, O. 

Spickwell, Denver Moores Hill 

Stevens, Ora Belle Moores Hill 

Stevens, Romney Versailles 

Sullivan, Mable Katherine Butlerville 

Surber, Harley Minnie Butlerville 

Taylor, George Arthur Patriot 

Todd, Edna Rachel Moores Hill 

Valentine, Marion Moores Hill 

Wade, Bessie Pearle Rising Sun 

Ward, Harley L Moores Hill 

Ward, Ada Leora Moores Hill 

Webster, Frances Osgood 

Wilber, Julia Aurora 

Winklev. Ora Etta Aurora 




Summary 



Collegiate 

Seniors 10 

Juniors 12 

Sophomores 7 

Freshmen 16 

Specials 4 

Department of Education 

Class C 4 

Class B 16 

Class A 29 

Academy 

Fourth year 19 

Third year 5 

Second year 25 

First year 35 

Music 

Piano 32 

Voice 11 

Public School 14 

Public Speaking 22 

Business 4 

Grand Total 264 

True Total 222 

Summer School 81 

Total for year 303 




Alumni of Moores Hill College 



This list has been carefully prepared from the best information 
available. Additional information or correction of errors will be 
appreciated by President of the College. 

Officers of the Alumni Association 

President, Claude Thomas, '94 Moores Hill 

1st Vice-President, . . Edgar Johnston, '94 Hammond 

2nd Vice-President, U. G. Abbott, '92, Brownsville 

Treasurer, Mrs. D. E. Johnston, '94, Moores Hill 

Cor. Secretary, Mrs. A. J. Bigney, '94, Moores Hill 

Recording Secretary, Mrs. S. J. Houston, '97 Moores Hill 

Executive Committee 

Mrs. G. W. Wood,'6o, Aurora 

A. J. Bigney, '88,.. . Moores Hill 

Oscar R. Ficken, '06, Moores Hill 

Ira A. Scripture, '02, Moores Hill 

Lucy Robertson, '05, Deputy 

Indianapolis Association 

President, Herbert M. Adkinson, '88. 
Secretary, P. Roscoe McAnally, '05. 

1858. 

Jane S. Kahler, (nee Churchill,) M. E. L., Artist, San Fernando, Cal. 

1859. 

* Robert F. Brewington, B. S., A. M., D. D. 

i860. 

* William H. Pye, A. B., A. M. 
*James Erskine, B. S. 
*Thomas L. Hayman, B. S. 

Permelia D. Bradfield, (nee Justis,) M. E. L. 

America S. Wood, (nee Moore,) M. E. L., Aurora, Ind. 

Mary C. Bigney, (nee Olcott,) M. E. L., 1910 Gilbert Ave., Cincin- 
nati, O. 

*Mary H. Smith, (nee VanDuzen,) M. E. L. 

1 861. 

*W. B. Huston, B. S., M. D. 

Orintha H. Robertson, (nee Maxwell,) M. E. L., 65 N. Ritter St., Ind- 
ianapolis, Ind. 

♦Sidney Tinker, B. S. 



60 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

1862. 

*Valeria Brewington, (nee Soper,) M. E. L. 

Helena J. Stewart, (nee Moore, M. E. L., Moores Hill, Ind. 

1864. 

*Ella S. Brown, (nee Soper,) M. E. L. 

Lucy J. Lewis, (nee Christie,) M. E. L. Madison, Ind. 

Dia McMillan, (nee Richardson,) M. E. L., Silver City, Iowa. 

*Lorinda M. Pickett, M. E. L. 

1866. 

Elmer W. Adkinson, B. S., A. M., Lawyer, Chicago, 111. 
*Cordia A. Sale, (nee Young,) M. E. L. 

1867. 

W. M. Adkmson, B. S., M. D., M. S., F. T. S., Lawyer, Indianapolis. 

♦Florence M. Adkinson, (nee Burlingame,) M. E. L. 

Matilda F. Ewbank, M. E. L., Farmers City, 111. 

M. Lide Ewbank, M. E. L., Moores Hill, Ind. 

*Wm. S. Falkenburg, B. S. 

Melvin M. Riggin, B. S., Telegrapher, Osborn, Kansas. 

1868. 

E. H. Wood, A. B, A. M., D. D., Bloomfield, Ind. 

Thomas V. Dodd, B. S., Teacher, Ocean Side, Cal. 

Roseline E. Jones, (nee Ewan) Writer, Geneva, New York. 

*Mary E. Miller. M. E. L. 

Sarah E. Moore, (nee Burns,) M. E. L., Vincennes, Ind. 

Elizabeth S. Thompson, (nee Lamb,) M. E. L., Author, Muncie, Ind. 

1869. 

Oliver P. Jenkins, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Professor in Stanford Univer- 
sity, Stanford University, California. 

Clara J. Martin, (nee Hansell,) A. B., A. M., Moores Hill, Ind. 

*J. A. Maxwell, A. B., A. M., D. D. 

J. A. Sargent, A. B., A. M., B. D., D. D., Sec. Preachers' Aid Society, 
1 1 10 Law Building, Indianapolis. 

*Mary G. Wood, (nee Hinkley,) A. B., A. M. 

Alta M. Comstock, (nee Churchill,) Teacher, 117 Everett Circle, Gar- 
field Park, Santa Cruze, Cal. 

Mary A. Harryman, (Mrs. Fowler,) M. E. L., Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

*Truman B. Jarard, B. S. 

*Mary M. Jerman, M. E. L. 

Julia L. D. Ruick, (nee Lamb,) M. E. L., Teacher. 

Millard F. Leroy, B. S., Banker, Manchester, Iowa. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 61 

*Vida J. Praigg, (nee Eldridge,) M. E. L. 

Anna R. Sawdon, (ne'e Miller,) M. E. L. Aurora, Ind. 

1870. 

Charles M. Harrison, A. B., A. M., Lawyer, Sioux Falls, N. D. 
J. W. Moore, A. B., A. M., Highland Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 
Robert W. Wood, A. B., A. M., Teacher, Shelbyville, Ind. 
Samuel L. Austin, B. S., C. E., Civil Engineer, Lucas, Kansas. 
Louise B. Cochran, (nee Baldwin,) M. E. L., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Lucy C. Schrader, (nee Combs,) M. E. L., Goshen, Ky. 
Alice M. Hayman, M. E. L., Reynoldsburg, O. 
Mattie E. Sparks, M. E. L., Teacher, Indianapolis, Ind. 
♦Thomas C. Kidd, B. S. 

1871. 

Belle Barnett, (nee Sargent,) A. B., A. M., Danville, 111. 

Clara V. Kummer, (nee Jenkins,) A. B., M. M., A. M., 2151 N. New 

Jersey St., Indianapolis, Ind. 
J. W. Dashiell, B. S., A. B., A. M., D. D., Minister, Fairland, Ind. 
Fannie S. Dashiell, (nee Meyers,) M. E. L., M. M., Fairland, Ind. 
Ezra G. Guard, B. S., Farmer, North Bend, Ohio. 
Lizzie S. Hayman, (nee Campbell,) M. E. L., Colusa, Cal. 
♦Kate E. Wright, (nee Phillips,) M. E. L. 

1872. 

♦Fernandez H. Gault, A. B., A. M. 

Alice M. Fitch, (nee Brewer,) B. S., Washington, D. C. 

E. A. Campbell, B. S., D. D., Minister, Indianapolis, Ind. 

*J. C. Gullett, B. S., D. D., Ph. D. 

Hattie E. Gullett, (nee Sawdon,) B. S., Anada, Colo. 

♦Mary E. Sparks, B. S. 

Alice C. Gullett, (nee Tarbox,) B. S., VanBuren, Ark. 

1873. 

George M. Hubbard, A. B., A. M., M. D. 

♦John R. Rice, B. S. 

Kate M. Young, (nee Ward,) B. S. 

1874. 

Samuel W. Hillman, A. B., A. M., Greensburg, Ind. 

John W. Duncan, B. S., B. D., D. D., Presiding Elder, Evansville, Ind. 

♦Chas. H. Moore, B. S. 

Fletcher M. Sisson, B. S., A. M., D. D., Minister Fremont, Neb. 

Sarah E. Sisson, (nee Whitson,) B. S., Author, Fremont, Neb. 



62 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



1875. 

*Elisha B. Cadwell, A. B., A. M. 

Will H. Isley, A. B., A. M., Lawyer, Shelbyville, Ind. 

*Ida B. Conger, (nee Willson,) B. S. 

Wm. R. Hazen, B. S., Lawyer, Topeka, Kans. 

Frank C. Kesler, B. S., Farmer, Newton, Kans. 

*Kate E. Gullett, (nee Mapes,) B. S. 

1876. 

J. H. T. Main, B. S., A. B., A. M., Ph. D., President Iowa College, 

Grinnell, Iowa. 
Emma M. Main, (nee Myers,) B. S., Grinnell, Iowa. 
J. R. E. Pheasant, B. S., Lawyer, Madison, Ind. 

1877. 

Melville Y. Bovard, A. M., D. D., Minister, Newark, N. J. 
Frank Drake, B. S., L. L. B., Lawyer, Shelbyville, Ind. 
Luella Gaskill, (nee Gault,) B. S., Frankfort, Ind. 

Charles W. Hargitt, B. S., A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Zoology, Syra- 
cuse University, Syracuse, New York. 
*Charles W. Gullett, B. S., A. M., D. D. 
Lillian M. Wallace, (nee Noble,) B. S., Moline, Kans. 
Charles L. Rodgers, B. S., Teacher, Weisburg, Ind. 

1878. 

William F. Heinrich, B. S., M. D., L. L. B., Lawyer, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Sallie A. Pettit, B. S., Teacher, Williamstown, Ky. 

1879. 

Lizzie R. Jenkins, (nee Hester,) A. B., A. M., Stanford University, 

Cal. 
Mollie E. Snyder, (nee Daily,) B. S., M. S., Teacher, Greensburg, Ind. 
J. R. T. Lathrop, B. S., M. S., D. D., Pastor Division Street Church, 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Antis, S. Lathrop, (nee Zeigler,) B. S., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Lizzie Turner, (nee Woodfill,) B. S., Greensburg. 

1880. 

•J. O. Churchill, B. S., A. B., A. M. 

John H. Heinrich, B. S., Bookkeeper, LaFollette, Tenn. 

*Hattie J. Wiggam, B. S. ; .; 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 63 

1881. 

Wilber O. Jenkins, A. B., A. M., M. D., Physician, 14 S. Seventh St., 

Terre Haute, Ind. 
Anna B. Goddard, (nee Clark,) B. S., Greensburg, Ind. 
Everett I). Rodgers, B S., M. D., Physician, Chicago, 111. 
Frank S. Tincher, B. S., D. D., Minister, Minneapolis, Minn. 

1882. 

David C. Barber, A. B., A. M., M. D., Physician, Los Angeles, Cal. 

George Cochran, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Minister, Oklahoma. 

Mary M. Shannon, (nee Hester,) A. B., Teacher, Greensburg, Ind. 

Jennie Wiggam, (nee Berkshire,) B. S., Teacher, Emporia, Kans. 

♦Calvin Carter, B. 5., M. S., M. D. 

Anna M. Tomlinson (nee Cotton,) B. S., Charlestown, Ind. 

♦Albert Doughty, B. S. 

Susan P. Doughty, (nee Hays) B. S., University Park, Denver, Colo. 

D. T. Hedges, B. S. 

Courtney E. Jenkins, (nee Woodtill,) B. S., 14 S. Seventh St., Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

1883. 

Edmund J. Lockwood, A. B., A. M., Minister, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Mary B. Lockwood, (nee Hester,) B. S., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Linda S. Clark, (nee Shaw,) A. B., A. M., Mequon, 111. 
Monroe Vayhinger, A. B., A. M., B. D., President Taylor University 

Upland, Ind. 
♦Carrie I. Goyer, B. S. 
♦Alice A. Barwise, (nee King,) B. S. 
Josie G. Johnston, (nee Moore,) B. S., Manzanola, Colo. 
Mary A. Locke, (nee Myers,) B. S., Topeka, Kansas. 

E. E. Olcott, B. S., M. S., Real Estate Agent, North Vernon, Ind. 
Ella C. Shaw, B. S., Missionary, Nankin, China. 

Maggie Coy, (nee Weeks,) B. S., M. S., Whitker, Cal. 

1884. 

Charles N. Peak, A. B., Ph. B. 

Lew E. Wilson, A. B., Grocer, 546 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Will 1. Lowry, B. S., Civil Engineer, Cripple Creek, Colo. 

1885. 

Mary B. Hole, (nee Weeks,) A. B., A. M., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Belle Conklin, (nee Adkinson,) B. S., Princeton, N. J. 
Oliver Hall, B. S., L. L. B., Lawyer, Butte, Montana. 



64 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

R. H. Moore, B. S., A. M., S. T. B., Chaplain Indiana Reformatory, 

Jeffersonville, Indiana. 
Alta M. Roberts, B.S., 164 E. 24th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Eva M. Opp, (nee Shields,) B. S., 1033 Washington Ave, Newport, Ky 
*Emma M. Lee, (nee Wood,) A. B., M. M. 

1886. 

mour, Ind. 
E. A. Robertson, A. B., A. M., Minister, Salem, Ind. 
Samuel W. Collett, B. S., M. S., Professor in Botany, State College, 

Pullman, Wash. 
Ora Powell, (nee Daughters,) B. S.,' Milan, Ind. 
Charles H. Meeds, B. S., C. E., Civil Engineer, Cincinnati. Ohio. 
Virgil W. Henderson, B. S., Teacher, Cleves, Ohio. 
John W. Johnson, B. S., Bank Cashier, Patriot, Ind. 

Edith Schockley, B. S., M. M., Teacher, ,Cal. 

Henry Ross, B. S., M. S., Minister, Houston, Va. 

1887. 
Laura E. Mclntire, (nee Ferren,) B. S., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Edith R. Pfarrenberger, (nee Myers,) B. S., M. M., A. B., A. M., Sey- 

1888. 
A. J. Bigney, A. B., A. M., Professor of Biology and Geology, Moores 

Hill College, Moores Hili, Ind. 
II. M. Adkinson, B. S., Manufacturer, Kentucky Ave. and Dover St., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
H. J. Clements, B. S., M. S., M. D., Professor in Medical College of 

Willammette University, Portland, Ore. 
Culla J. Vayhinger, (nee Johnson,) B. S., Pres. Indiana W. C. T. U., 

Upland, Ind. 
*Sadie Mitchell, (nee Rice,) B. S. 
Henry B. Smith, B. S., A. B., A. M., Latin Instructor West Side High 

School, 368 S. Grant Ave., Denver , Ccl. 

1889. 
H. W. Phillips, A. B., Stenographer, Indianapolis, Ind. 
W. E. Shaw, A. B., A. M., B. D., Minister, Onarga, 111. 
Wallace D. Corya, B. S., M. D., Minister, Ind. 
Ruth Moore, B. S., Moores Hill, Ind. 

T. F. Robertson, B. S., M. D., Physician, 2313 East Michigan St., In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Pearl Shockley, B. S., M. S., nurse ,Cal. 

E. L. Wimmer, B. S., Minister, Richland, Ind. 
*John W Collett, B. S. 
♦Geo. P. Miller, B. S. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 65 

1890. 
Harry F. Bain, B. S., M. S., Ph. D., Editor of Scientific and Mining 

Press, San Francisco, Cal. 
Sam F. Huffman, B. S., Locomotive Engineer, 
*Chas. W. Lewis, B. S., M. S., D. D. 
John C. White, B. S., M. S., Minister, Logansport, Ind. 
Marian White, (nee Liddle,) B. S., Logansport, Ind. 
Theodore Shockley, B. S., Bookkeeper, East St. Louis, 111. 
Edwin C. Zeigler, B. S., Real Estate Agent, Jacksonville, Fla. 

1891. 

Jennie E. Fleming, (nee Bain,) Dillsboro, Ind. 
Lillian Carter, B. S., Teacher, Princeton, Ind. 

Clarence Lambertson, A. B., Manager Indianapolis Star, Indiana- 
polis, Ind. 
Rose T. Robertson, Superintendent King Home, Marshall, Texas. 
Verton W. Ross, B. S., Prin. High School, Christianburg, Ohio. 

1892. 

U. G. Abbott' A. B., Minister, Brownsville, Ind. 

E. A. Wood, A. B., Reporter for The Star, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Edith Finley, (nee Spencer,) Music Diploma, Kansas. 

1893. 

*J. L. Brown, A. B. 

Minnie B. Brown, A. B., Moores Hill, Ind. 

James E. Daughters, B. S., Lawyer, 285 LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

J. R. Houston, B. S., M. S., Supt. Schools, Aurora, Ind. 

Chas. E. Line, A. B., A. M., S. T. B., D. D., Minister, Ind. 

Laura Liddle, B. S., Teacher, Muncie, Ind. 

*F. S. Maltby, A. B. 

E. C. Strickler, B. S., Merchant, Girard, Kan. 

W. D. Robinson, B. S. D., Publisher Versailles Republican, Versailles, 

Ind. 
Nellie Darby, Music Diploma, Music Teacher, 33 N. Jefferson Ave., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Laura E. Fagley, (nee Jennings,) Music Diploma, Lawrenceburg, Ind. 
Anna Meeds, (nee Johnson,) Music Diploma, Meridian, Ala. 

1894. 

Clara Johnston, (nee Bigney,) B>. S., M. S., Moores Hill, Ind. 
Carrie E. Bigney, (nee Ewan,) B. S., Moores Hill, Ind. 
Laura L. McClure, (nee Ewan,) B. S., Starkville, Colo. 
Edgar F. Johnston, B. S., Insurance Agent, Hammond, Ind. 
C. A. Jennings, B. S., Journalist, 3306 Penna Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 



66 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

U. F. Lewis, A. B., Lawyer, Seymour, Ind. 
Earl E. Martin, A. B., Editor Cleveland Press, Cleveland, O. 
James Ross, A. B., A. M., Supt. Schools, Fort Recovery, Ohio. 
Alfred Ross, A. B., A. M., Supt. Schools, New Carlisle, Ohio. 
Ben H. Scranton, A. B., Farmer, Rising Sun, Ind. 
*Quincy G. Spence, A. B., A. M . 
Claude B. Thomas, A. B., Farmer, Moores Hill, Ind. 
Emma E. Moore, (nee Smith,) B. S. D., Teacher, Eaton, Colo. 
Perry Canfield, B. S. D., Principal of First Ward School, Covington, 
Kentucky. 

1895. 

Carrie M. Beatty, A. B., Trained Nurse, Chicago, III. 

C. C. Bonnell, B. S., M. S., Minister, East Park M. E. Church, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

F. C. Green, A. B., Editor and Publisher, Milroy, Ind. 

R. S. Hyde, A. B., A. M., Minister, Omaha, Neb. 

Margaret Collier, (nee Johnson, )A. B., Bicknell, Ind. 

Mary E. Thomas, (nee Moore,) A. B., Moores Hill, Ind. 

Luella Clark Byrne, (nee Green,) A. B., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Leslie J. Shroyer, B. S., Student in Garrett Biblical Institute, Evans- 
ston, 111. 

Edith Lou Speer, A. B., Teacher, Berea College, Berea, Ky. 

Wm. D. Trout, B. S., Minister, Cambridge City, Ind. 

Allie Frances Trout, (nee Rice,) B. S., Cambridge City, Ind. 

W. G. Washburn, B. S., Telegrapher, 519 Alma Street, Austin Sta- 
tion, Chicago, 111. 

1896. 

*Mary Bain, A. B. 

C. H. Beckett, B. S., Professor in Mathematics, Purdue University, 
Lafayette, Ind. 

Ida May Bonnell, (nee Campbell,) A. B., Indianapolis, Ind. 

H. C. Doles, B. S., Supt. Schools, Clarksburg, Ind. 

Emily Dashiell, A. B., Stenographer and Bookkeeper, Iowa College, 
Grinnell, Iowa. 

Agnes F. Lewis, (nee Fleming,) Seymour, Ind. 

F. S. Miller, A. B., A. M., Minister, , Ohio. 

Benj. S. Potter, A. B., M. D., Physician, Indianapolis, Ind. 

J. T. Scull, B. S., B. S. T., Minister, Clay City, Ind. 

"John C Wood, A. B., M. D. 

1897. 

W. E. Beatty, A. B., Electrician, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Nellie Clark, B. S., Teacher, Bellevue, Ky. 

E. I. LaRue, B. S., M .S., Minister, Corydon, Ind. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 67 

S. A. Morrow, A. B., A. M., Minister, Waldron, Ind. 

C. J. Stallard, A. B., Railroad Conductor, Tucson, Ariz. 

W. E. Peters, B. S., Secretary of Y. M. C A., Wisaier, Miss. 

C. M. Kroft, A. B., A. M., Minister, Whiteland, Ind. 

Clara Maude Smith, (nee Wood,) B. S., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Nellie R. Houston, (nee Stewart,) B. S., Moores Hill, Ind. 

1898. 

Edith E. Shoemaker, (nee Boldrey,) B. S., M. S., Daytona, Florida. 

Mary S. Adair, (nee Campbell,) A. B., A. M., Wooster, O. 

Joel P. Davis, A. B. 

Preston S. Hyde, A. B., A. M., Missionary, Naini Tal, India. 

Richard N. Hargitt, B. S., Teacher, Aurora, Ind. 

Crates S. Johnson, A. B., Minister, Tiffin, O. 

Leora L. Jones, (nee Loyd,) B. S., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hortense Martin, A. B., Moores Hill, Ind. 

Trene Hyde, (nee Martin,) A. B., Naini Tal, India. 

*Louis Ross, A. B. 

Edna Shockley, (nee Shook,) Music Diploma, East St. Louis, 111. 

1899. 

Otto L. Curl, B. S., Minister, , O. 

F. H. Collier, A. B., A. M., Minister, Bicknell, Ind. 

L. M. Edwards, A. B., A. M., B. D., Minister, Portland, Ind. 

Minnie A. McCormic, (nee Hall,) A. B., Bedford, Ind. 

L. B. Rogers, B. S., Professor of Education, Tri-State Normal, An- 
gola, Ind. 

C. R. Stout, A. B., A. M., Professor Latin and Greek, Taylor Univer- 
sity, Upland, Ind. 

W. F. Smith, A. B., A. M., Minister, Connersville, Ind. 

Edna L. Wallace, (nee Jennings,) B. S., Canton, O. 

Joel C. Walker, A. B., Student in Garrett Biblical Institute, Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Agnes Ramsay, (nee Wilson,) A. B., Greensburg, Ind. 

Alta Blackmore, Music Diploma, Teacher, Aurora, Ind. 

1900. 

Laura D. Smith, (nee Askin,) A. B., Clay City, Ky. 

S. J. Copeland, A. B., A. M., M. D., Physician, Indianapolis, Ind. 

A. H. Green, B. S., Bookkeeper, 105, 19th St., Buffalo, New York. 
H. E. Robertson, B. S., Printer and Publisher, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Eleanor M. Robertson, A. B., Teacher, Deputy, Ind. 

Florence M. Edwards (nee Sargent,) A. B., Portland, Ind. 

B. R. Smith, A. B., M. D., Physician, Clay City, Ky. 

F. B. Ward, A. B., B. S. T., A. M., Minister, Oakland, 111. 



68 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

J. R. Willey. B. S., Farmer, R. F. D., Harrison, Ohio. 

Harriet Willey, (nee George,) Music Diploma, R. F. D., Harrison, O. 

Louise F. Goddard, Music Diploma, Olney, 111. 

1 901. 

Florence Belle Boldrey, (nee Barclay,) B. S., Rockport,Ind. 

Y. h. Boldrey, B. S., B. S. T., Minister, Rockport, l"d. 

Anna C. Bennett, Ph. B., Teacher, 230 Washington Ave., Shelbyville, 

Ind. 
V. B. Hargitt, A. B., Student in Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J. 
R. H. Martin, A. B., Hardware Dealer, Hope, Ind. 
Lucy Ross, (nee Pelsor,) A. B., Greensburg, Ind. 
C. B. Sylvester, A. B., Minister, San Mateo, Cal. 
Pearl Sylvester, (nee Robinson,) Music Diploma, San Mateo, Cal. 
W. A. Vayhinger, B. S., Merchant, Osgood, Ind. 
Dowd B. White, A. B., Lawyer, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Olive Miller, (nee Brenton,) Music Diploma, Chicago, 111. 
Nettleton B. Maltby, (nee Hodapp,) Music Diploma, Aurora, Ind. 

1902. 

Mary Belle Ward, (nee Herrick,) B. S., Columbus, Ohio. 

H. H. Sargent, B. S., LI. B., Lawyer, 11 10 Law Building, Indiana- 
polis, Ind. 

Fannie Fayette Marshall, Music Diploma, Music Teacher, Lawrence- 
burg, Ind. 

G. H. Reibold, B. S. D., B. S., Minister and Superintendent of Public 
Schools, Hope/, Ind. 

Ira A. Scripture, B. S. D., Hardware Dealer, Moores Hill, Ind. 

1903. 

J. R. Bolley, A. B., Correspondent, Sears & Roebuck, Waterloo, Iowa. 

W. H. McDowell, A. B., B. D., Minister, Madison, Ind. 

C. D. Humes, B. S., M. D., Physician in Stern's Sanatorium, Indiana- 
polis, Ind. 

W. H. Graves, B. S., M. S., M. D., Physician, Carlton, Kan. 

1904. 

Flora Winifred Snyder, Ph. B., Teacher of Latin and English, High 
School, Aurora, Ind. 

Rachel Dashiell, Music Diploma. 

1905. 

John F. Cook, B. S., Minister, Hatton, Washington. 

Frederick L. Fagley, B. S., M. S., Student in Theological Seminary, 
Oberlin, O. 

James H. Finley, B. S., Student Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, 
111. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 69 

William G. Glover, B. S., Principal Public Schools, Milan, Ind. 

Eva K. Edwards, (nee Jackson,) Clifty, Ind. 

Roy R. Lee, A. B., Law Student, New York City. 

P. Roscoe McAnally, A. B., Secretary in the City .Y. M. C. A., Ind- 
ianapolis, Ind. 

Lucy Robertson, A. B., Deputy, Ind. 

Clarence M. Vawter, A. B., Minister, Batesville, Ind. 

John W. Wimkley. A. B., B. S. T., A. M., Minister, Auburn, Cal. 

Edith Wood, A. B., A. M., Student in Indiana University, Blooming- 
ton, Ind. 

Oliver E. Faulkner, B. S. D., Principal of Schools, Connell, Wash. 

*Leota Dole, Music Diploma. 

Julia Evans, Music Diploma, Teacher of Music, Otisco, Ind. 

Melvina Givan, Music Diploma, Music Teacher, Aurora, R. F. D., 
N0.2. 

Leoline Jaquith, Music Diploma, Music Teacher, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Florence Shockley, (nee Laws,) Music Diploma, Moores Hill, Ind. 

1906. 

Edith Dashiell, A. B., Fairland, Ind. 

Fannie Dashiell, A. B., Teacher in Industrial School, Ashville, N. C. 

J. Philip Armond, B. S., Student in Theological Seminary, Boston, 

Mass. 
Oscar R. Ficken, B. S., Professor of Modern Languages \n Moores 

Hill College, Moores Hill, Ind. 
Edward E. Eaton, B. S., Teacher, Napoleon, Ind. 
Ernest R. Heath, B. S., Merchant, East Enterprise, Ind. 
Elizabeth Duchemin, B. Ped., Teacher, Aurora, Ind. 
Arthur Todd, B. Ped., Farmer, Moores Hill, Ind. 
Bertha Cook, (nee Garrigues,) Hatton, Wash. 
Mayme Todd, B. Ped., Aurora, Ind. 
Kirk Earle Wallace, B. Ped., Physical Director, City Y. M. C. A, 

Canton, Ohio. 
Anna Warner, Diploma in Elocution, Special Student, Moores Hill 

College, Moores Hill, Ind. 

1907. 

Paul Eugene Edwards, A. B., Minister, Clifty, Ind. 

Lillian Lucile Miller, A. B., Moores Hill, Ind. 

ina Moselley, A. B., Student in Music, Moores Hill College, Mooies 

Hill, Ind. 
Earl S. Riley, A. B., Student in Theological Seminary, Boston, Mass. 
Ora Belle Stevens, A. B., Instructor in Latin, Physical Director for 

Ladies, Moores Hill College, Moores Hill, Ind. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 



Samuel H. Armand, B. S., Student in Boston Theological Seminary, 
Boston, Mass. 

Clyde H. Cottingham, B. S., Bookkeeper, Dupont Powder Co , 
Chicago, 111. 

Joseph C. Edwards, B. S., Science Teacher in High School, Seymour. 
Ind. 

Meda Garrigues, B. S., Sunman, Ind. 

Joseph Edward Herbst, B. S., Clerk in office of the Northern R. R. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Thomas Jefferson Hart, B. S., Minister, Versailles, Ind. 

Leslie Stevenson Rosser, B. S., Teacher of Science and German, 
Wenatchee, Wash. 

James B. Wirt, B. S., Post-Graduate Student in Chemistry, Purdue 
University, Lafayette, Ind. 

Fred C. Bass. Normal Diploma, Principal of Puplic School, Newpoinf, 
Ind. 

Susan Grace Fagley, Normal Diploma, Teacher, Moores Hill, Ind. 

Grace S. Hathaway, Normal Diploma, Teacher, Aurora, Ind. 

Herschel O. LaHue, Normal Diploma. Teacher, Ramsey, Ind. 

Eva Bernice Miller, Normal Diploma, Student in Moores Hill College. 

Pearl Miller, Normal Diploma, Teacher, Aurora, Ind. 

Oththo A. Richardson, Normal Diploma, Teacher, Moores Hill, Ind. 

Lillian Elzora Roberts, Normal Diploma, Teacher, Versailles, Ind. 

Emma Taylor, Normal Diploma, Teacher, Aurora, Ind. 

Lelia Dever, Music Diploma, Music Teacher, Milan, Ind. 

Bessie Grimsley, Music Diploma, Music Teacher, Moores Hill, Ind. 

Georgia G. Slater (nee Grimsley,) Music Diploma, Cincinnati, O. 

Nellie Toole, Music Diploma, Music Teacher, Milan, Ind. 

Paul R. Tindall, Vocal Diploma, Medical Student, Cincinnati, O. 

Mary Daisy Wallace, Diploma in Elocution, Battle Creek, Mich. 

1908. 

Ruby Merle Gullette, A. B., Professor of Latin and Greek in Sandy 
Valley Seminary, Paintsville, Ky. 

Tyson Harrison, A. B., New Salem, Ind. 

Greta Smith, A. B., Student in Missionary Training School, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 

Kirk Earl Wallace, B. Ped., A. B., Physical Director in City Y. M. C. 
A. Canton, Ohio. 

Clara Anna Westhafer, A. B., Professor of English and History, Tay- 
lor University, Upland, Ind. 

Opal Elwyn, B. S., Delaware, fnd. 

Alice Harriett Tasker, Cincinnati, O. 

John Frederick Dashiell, B. S., Post-Graduate Student and Instructor 
in English and History in Moores Hill College, Moores Hill, Ind. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin. 71 

Normal Diploma 

Freda Marie Gibson, (nee Barncklow,) New Castle, Ind. 
Ernest R. Brown, Physical Director, Instructor in History and Arith- 
metic and Student in Moores Hill College. 
Helen Henderson, Teacher, Versailles, Ind. 
Oris R. Hooper, Principal of Public Schools, Dillsboro, Ind. 
Eliza Miller, Teacher, Aurora, Ind. 
Harriett Lucetta Roberts, Teacher, Versailles, Ind. 
Ora E. Winkley, Teacher, Aurora, Ind. 

Diploma in Music — Piano 

Carrie Mulford, Music Teacher and Student, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
♦Deceased. 

Wants of The College 

The history of Moores Hill College will verify the declaration 
that she has few equals in the matter of producing creditable results 
with limited means. The hour has come, however, when the patience 
of the past must be rewarded by greatly enlarged facilities. The new 
Carnegie Hall must be equipped with a larger supply of physical and 
chemical apparatus. 

The College Library needs a fund that will make possible new 
volumes from time to time. 

A fine opportunity for geneous friends of Christian Education, is 
found in the endowment of professor-ships 

We call upon our friends to co-operate in increasing our perma- 
nent endowmejnt. Moores Hill College ought to have one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand dollars permanent endowment at once. 

We call upon all of our friends to cooperate in increasing our 
permanent endowment. Moores Hill College ought to have one hun- 
dred and fifty thousands dollars permanent endowment at once. 

FORMS 



Subscription to Living Endowment of Moores Hill College 
$5,000 income equivalent to $100,000 endowment. 

I hereby pledge myself to pay to Moores Hill College 

dollars on or before the 15th day of May each 

year for five consecutive years after date. 

Date 19 

Signed 

Address 



72 Moores Hill College Bulletin. 

Bequest of Money — Will 

I give and bequeath to the ''Trustees of Moores Hill College," a 
corporation organized under the laws of Indiana, and located at 

Moores Hill, Indiana, the sum of , 

and the receipt of the Treasurer of said corporation shall be a suffic- 
ient discharge to my executors for the same. 

Devise of Land 

I give and devise to the "Trustees of Moores Hill College," a 
corporation organized under the laws of Indiana, and located at 
Moores Hill, Indiana, in fee simple the following lands and premises, 
described as follows : 



to have and hold the same with the appurtenances thereto, for the 
purposes of said corporation. 

Residue of an Estate 

I hereby give, devise and bequeath to the "Trustees of Moores 
Hill College," a corporation organized under the laws of Indiana, and 
located at Moores -Hill, Indiana, all of the rest, residue and remainder 
of my estate, real, personal and mixed, of which I shall die seized oi 
possessed, for the purposes of said corporation. 

Bequest of Money or Land as a Codicil 

I do hereby make 

this as a codicil to my last Will and Testament, which bears the date 

of that is to say : 

I give and bequeath (of land, I give and devise) to the "Trustees 
of Moores Hill College," a corporation organized under the laws < f 
Indiana, and located ot Moores Hill, Indiana, the sum of 

(if it be real estate, describe it) and the receipt of the Treasurer of 
said corporation shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors for the 
same. I hereby ratify and confirm my said Will, except as hereby 
modified and altered. 

Form of Attesting 

The foregoing instrument of writing was on this day 

of A. D., 19 , signed, sealed, published and 

declared b3' said , as and for his last 

Will and Testament, in our presence, and we have, at his request, in 
his presence, and in the presence of each other, subscribed our names 
as witnesses thereto. 

(Signed) 

(Signed) 



59 

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45 
* I 

4 

21 
42 r 

44 

H 

14 

6 

9. 
33 

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12 

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12 



Moores Hill College 



BULLETIN 



Catalogue Number 
1913-1914 



10? ESTO \\«*\ 

iSiQuODESSEinJ 



w 



VI DERIS/ 



- ^/ 



■.<** .fc-V 



MAY, 1914 



VOLUME V NUMBER 2 

Moores Hill College 

Bulletin 



*Qr/ c~n \"d* 
:§: ESTQ \t*'. 

:||QUODESSEjS| 
\ AV I DERIS./ / 



MAY, 1914 



Published Quarterly by the Trustees of Moores Hill College, 
Moores Hill, Indiana 



Entered as second class matter, December 17, 1909, at the Postomce at Moores Hill, 
Indiana, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



Calendar 1914 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


.. 1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 . . 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 ■ • 








MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 


12 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 22 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


1 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


12 3 

4 5 '6789 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 18 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 









Calendar 1915 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 

..123456 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


S M T W T F S 


- 12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 18 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 28 27 
28 


12 3 

4 5 '6789 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 16 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


.12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
80 31 . . 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 25 27 28 
29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 



M T W T F S 



12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 



OCTOBER 



S M T W T F S 



12 

8 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 36 27 28 29 30 
31 .... . 



NOVEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



.. 12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 



DECEMBER 



S M T W T F S 



12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



M cores Hill College Bulletin 3 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

1914 

June 2 — Tuesday, Twelve Weeks' Summer Term Opens. 

June 11-13 — Thursday to Saturday, Examination of Classes. 

June 12 — Friday, Academy Commencement. 

June 13 — Saturday, Senior Class Exercises. 

June 14 — Baccalaureate Sunday. 

June 15 — Monday, Annual Musical Festival. 

June 16 — Tuesday, Society Day and Meeting of the Board of Tnmcc» 

and Visitors. 
June 17 — Wednesday, Fifty-eighth Annual Commencement, AlumnL, 

Reunion. 
June 18 — Thursday, Six Weeks' Summer Term Opens. 
August 21 — Friday, Twelve Weeks' Summer Term Closes. 
September 22 — Tuesday, Fall Term Opens. 
November 26 to December 1 — Thursday to Tuesday, Thanksgiving 

Vacation. 
December 3 — Thursday, Annual Oratorical Contest. 
December 10 — Thursday, Term Concert. 
December 22-23 — Tuesday- Wednesda)', Term Examinations 
December 24 — Thursday, Holiday Vacation Begins. 

1915 

January 5 — Tuesday, Winter Term Opens. % 

February 4 — Thursday, Day of Prayer For Colleges. 

March 4 — Thursday, Term Concert. 

March 23-25 — Tuesday to Thursday, Term Examinations. 

March 30 — Tuesday, Spring Term Opens. 

May 11 — Tuesday, Twelve Weeks' Mid-Spring Term Opens. 

June 1 — Tuesday, Twelve Weeks' Summer Term Opens. 

June 10-12 — Thursday to Saturday, Examination of Classes. 

June 11 — Friday, Academy Commencement. 

June 12 — Saturday, Senior Class Exercises. 

June 13 — Baccalaureate Sunday. 

June 14 — Monday, Annual Musical Festival. 

June 15 — Tuesday, Society Day and Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

and Visitors. 
June 16 — Wednesday, Fifty-ninth Annual Commencement, Alumni 

Reunion. 
June 17 — Thursday, Six Weeks' Summer Term Opens. 
August 20 — Friday, Twelve Weeks' Summer Term Ends. 
September 21— Tuesday, Fall Term Opens. 



4 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

TRUSTEES 

Ex-Officio, Harry Andrews King, S. T. B., D. D., President of College. 

TERM EXPIRES 1914 

J. Frank Robertson, M. D Indianapolis 

Hanson D. Moore Moores Hill 

J. W. French Moores Hill 

Benjamin F. Adams, Jr Bloomington 

Q. Robert Hauss, A. M., M. D Sellersburg 

Hon. William H. O'Brien Lawrenceburg 

G. S. Tarbox Areola, III. 

Rev. U. G. Leazenby, D. D Crawfordsville 

C. Dolph Humes, M. D Indianapolis 

TERM EXPIRES 1915 

"W. M. Green, Jr Rising Sun 

Hon. James E. Watson Rushviile 

William E. Stark Cincinnati, O. 

George W. Wood Aurora 

Rev. George H. Murphy Moores Hill 

Rev. J. A. Sargent, D. D Indianapolis 

C. M. Bowers Moores Hill 

Rev. E. H. Wood, D. D Washington 

Hon. Ward H. Watson Indianapolis 

TERM EXPIRES 1918 

Rev. J. W. Dashiell, D. D Moores Hill 

Rev. C. C. Edwards, D. D Princeton 

J. H. Morison, M. D Hartsvilie 

Rev. M. B. Hyde, D. D New Albany 

J. F. Spencer, M. D Moores Hill 

J. E. Crozier Madison 

A. A. Swartz Jeffersonville 

Rev. W. B. Grimes, A. M Fernwood, 111. 

H. J. Walsman Batesville 

CONFERENCE VISITORS 

Rev. J. L. Funkhouser Hartsvilie 

Rev. W. H. Wylie Jeffersonville 

Rev. U. G. Abbott Wheatland 

Rev. J. T. Scull, Jr College Corner, O. 

Rev. Festus A. Steele, D. D Seymour 

Rev. W. S. Rader, D. D Washington 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 5 

ALUMNI VISITORS 

Rev. Edward I. LaRue, Class of '97 Indianapolis 

Benjamin S. Potter, Class of '96 Juliette 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Hon. Ward H. Watson, Indianapolis President 

M. B. Hyde, New Albany Vice President 

George H. Murphy, Moores Hill Secretary 

J. W. French, Moores Hill Treasurer 

J. Edward Murr, A. M., Greenwood, 

John W Dashiell, D. D Educational Secretaries 

COMMITTEES OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Executive Committee 

Harry Andrews King, President; C. M. Bowers, Vice President; 
George H. Murphy, Secretary; J. H. Martin, J. W. French, 
H. D. Moore, H. J. Walsman, W. S. Rader, C. D. Humes. 

Buildings and Grounds 

E. I. LaRue William Green J. W. Dashiell 

James E. Crozier H. D. Moore 

Auditing Committee 
H. J. Walsman W. S. Rader George W. W T ood 

Loans and Investments 

A. A. Swartz J. F. Robertson W. H. O'Brien 

C. M. Bowers B. F. Adams 

Nominating Committee 

G. H. Murphy W. E. Stark W. B. Grimes W. S. Wiley 

J. A. Sargent G. S. Tarbox J. W. French Q. R. Hauss 

Faculty Committee 

C. M. Bowers C. C. Edwards E. H. Boldrey M. B. Hyde 

J. F. Scull E. H. Wood U. G. Abbott F. A. Steele 

Honorary Degrees 
M. B. Hyde J. E. Watson George H. Murphy 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 

FACULTY AND OTHER OFFICERS 



STA 

Bigney 

Torbet 

Bigney 

Ficken 

Bigney 

Aldrich 

Torbet 

Bigney 

Aldrich 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

HARRY ANDREWS KING, D. D., 
President of the College 
ANDREW J. BIGNEY, Sc. D, 
Vice President and Registrar 
RICHARD O. FICKEN, B. S. 

Secretary of the Faculty 

CHARLES E. TORBET, A. M, 

Librarian 

NELLIE A. SIMMONS, 

Assistant Librarian 

EDNA BIGNEY, 

Secretary to the President 

NDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
Publications and Course of Study 

Aldrich Torbet Phillips Reibold 

Athletics 
Ficken Stevens Burlingame 

Religious Work 
Aldrich Williams Stevens Robertson 

Social Functions 
Reagan Williams Ritter Moynahan 

Summer School 
Torbet Ficken Stevens Riebold Reagan 
Debate and Oratory 
Ficken Williams Torbet Ritter 

Library and Reading Room 
Aldrich Bigney Simmons Wilcox 

Graduate Work 

Aldrich Torbet 

Extra Studies 

Torbet Reibold 



Moorcs Hill College Bulletin 

FACULTY 

(With the exception of the President, in the order of appointment. 

Rev. Harry Andrews King, S. T. B., D. D., President, 
Professor of Biblical Literature and Philosophy. 

Rev. John H. Martin, D. D. 

Emeritus Professor of Biblical Literature. 

Andrew J. Bicney, A. M., Sc. D., Vice President, 
Professor of Biology and Geology. 

Benjamin W. Aldrich, A. M., 

Professor of Ancient Languages. 

Mrs. E. Louise Williams, Mus. B., 

Principal of Music Department — Pianoforte. 

Charles E. Torbet, A. M., 

Professor of English and History. 

♦Clarence E. Smith, B. S., A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Richard O. Ficken, B. S., 

Professor of Modern Languages. 

Ora B. Stevens, A. M., 

Instructor in Greek and Latin, 

Mary A. Moynahan, 

Instructor in Violin, Guitar and Mandolin. 

Olive D. Burlingame, 

Physical Director for Women. 

Cyrus G. Phillips, B. Ed., A. B. 
Professor of Agriculture. 

George H. Reibold, B. Ped., B. S. 

Professor of Educational Psychology and Method. 

Madeleine B. Ritter, 

Instructor in Public Speaking. 



♦Resigned January, 1914. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 



Mrs. Elsie Dell Wilcox, A. B., 
Instructor in Vocal Music. 

Maurice McKain, 

Physical Director for Men. 

Edward A. Robertson, A. M., D. D., 
Instructor in English Bible. 

Marie S. King, 

Assistant in History. 

Norma L. Tielking, 

Assistant in English. 

Nelle Sherrod, 

Instructor in Drawing. 

Josie B. Ya<vy, 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

Charles A. Reagan, 

Instructor in Education and English* 

Helen M. Henderson, 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

Richard H. Smith, 

Assistant in Surveying. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 9 

LECTURES, ENTERTAINMENTS AND ADDRESSES 



Commencement, 1913 
June 5 — Class Day Exercises of Senior Academy Class. 
June 6 — Rev. L. F. Dimmitt, D. D., Academy Graduation. 
June 7 — Senior Piano Recital. 
June 7 — Senior Class Exercises. 

June 8 — President Harry Andrews King, D. D., Baccalaureate Sermon. 
June 9 — Annual Concert of Music Department. 
June 10 — Joint Literary Society Program. Rev. William R. Bennett, 

Address before Literary Societies. 
June 11 — Bishop Luther B. Wilson, D. D. LL. D., Commencement 

Address. 



May 17— Rev. C. D. Wilson, "Jean Val Jean." 

May 19— Rev. E. C. Wareing, D. D., "The Human Element in 

Journalism." 
Sept. 23— Rev. W. S. Bovard, D. D., "The Victory of Life." 
Oct. 7— Rev. E. A. Robertson, D. D., "The Value of the Bible and 

Bible Study." 
Nov. 2— Rev. John W. Hancher, D. D., "Mexico." 
Nov. 8 — Harmony Concert Company. 
Nov. 18 — Miss Julia Kipp, "Women of India." 
Dec. A — Annual Oratorical Contest; first prize, Helen M. Henderson; 

second prize, O. A. Smith. 
Dec. 5-10— E. V. Hawkins, Rev. G. H. Murphy, Rev. H. H. Allen, 

Evangelistic meetings. 
Dec. 15 — J. Walter Wilson, Impersonator. 
Feb. 4 — Regimental Quartette. 

Feb. 5 — Rev. John T. Jones, Sermon on "Day of Prayer For Colleges." 
Feb. 10— Mrs. Mary Carr Curtis, "The Three Touches." 
March 4 — Miss Maud Kelsey, "The Need of the Women of the 

World." 
March 20— President William P. Dearing, "The Other Fellow." 
April 2 — Jones Concert Company. 
April 14 — T. A. Rymer, Arthur Ward, "The Y. M. C. A. Secretaryship 

as a Life Work." 



10 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

GENERAL INFORMATION 



GEOGRAPHICAL 

Moores Hill is situated in Dearborn County, Indiana, on the 
main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Southwestern Railway. It is 
forty miles west of Cincinnati and fifty miles east of Seymour. It 
is on the crest of the last row of hills which rise from the Ohio 
river and is one of the highest points in Indiana. 

HISTORICAL 

The following dates will serve as a bare outline of the history of 
the College and will also show the remarkable expansion of recent 
years: 

1853. Several far-seeing philanthropists headed by John C. 
Moore resolved to establish a college at Moores Hill that should be 
devoted to Christian education. 

1854. Organization effected. 

1856. First building completed and College opened. 

1898. Mann property north of the campus purchased and house 
fitted up for Ladies' Dormitory. 

1899. Will F. Stevens gymnasium built. 

1903. Brick building on Main street owned by Captain H. D. 
Moore purchased and fitted up for Science hall. Used by Scientific 
department from 1903 to 1908. 

1906. Gift of $18,750 secured from Andrew Carnegie and 
ground broken for Carnegie hall by Governor Hanly. 

1907. College re-incorporated. Corner stone of Carnegie Hall 
laid. College accredited by State Board of Education for preparing 
teachers in classes A and B. 

1908. Carnegie Hall completed, and dedicated June 18. The 
Faculty has been increased, and the courses of study revised twice, 
within the past decade. Every effort is made to keep abreast with 
the best educational thought and theories of the day. 

1912. Course in Agriculture offered. Gift of $10,000 by Mrs. 
Charlotte Glover of Louisville, Ky. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 11 

ORGANIZATION 

Moores Hill College is under the management of a Board of 
Trustees, consisting of the President of the College, ex-officio, and 
twenty-seven members elected by the Indiana Annual Conference for 
a period of three years. In addition to the regular members, the 
Conference appoints six conference visitors and two alumni visitors, 
who meet with the board and take part in its deliberations. 

The Board of Trustees has full power to receive and administer 
all funds, to appoint faculties, to confer degrees and to make all 
laws for the government of the institution. 

BUILDINGS 

Moore Hall is a substantially built three-story brick. It con- 
tains the Edith Watson recital hall (the former chapel), large, pleas- 
ant recitation rooms and society halls. The Music and Public Speak- 
ing departments occupy rooms in this building. 

The Will F. Stevens gymnasium affords excellent advantages for 
work in physical culture for both men and women. It is 70x40 
feet, thus having ample floor room for basket ball and other indoor 
sports. It is equipped with shower baths and dressing rooms. 

Carnegie Hall. This splendid new fifty thousand dollar building, 
we feel justly proud of, in the belief that in simple, substantial 
beauty and convenience it is not surpassed in the state. It contains 
exclusive of halls and corridors, forty-eight rooms, consisting of 
laboratories, supply rooms, cloak rooms, lavatories, lecture rooms, 
chapel, library, Christian association and society halls. It is heated 
by steam, and is modern and convenient in every respect. 



LIBRARY 

The Library has light, pleasant quarters in the east end, first 
floor of Carnegie Hall. It contains over six thousand volumes and 
more than two thousand pamphlets. Books especially adapted to 
the needs of the regular departments are being secured as rapidly 
as possible. A number have been added during the past year and 
the magazine list increased. The reading tables are now well sup- 
plied with many of the best general literary and scientific magazines 
as well as with daily, weekly and religious papers. 



12 Moores Hill Collere Bulletin 

SUMMER TERM 

It will be seen by reference to the College calendar that the 
College maintains a summer term of twelve weeks. The object of 
the term is to provide opportunities to those who wish to prepare 
for teaching under the laws of the state and also to provide special 
courses for any teachers or others who may find it convenient to 
attend a summer school. The instruction is given mainly by members 
of the regular Faculty. Any who are interested in this term should 
send to the President for the special summer term Bulletin. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCE 

Moores Hill College does not seek to develop the mind alone, 
but believing that education consists of more than mere intellectual 
training, strives to bring to the highest possible stage of development 
the three-fold nature of man — spirit, mind and body — and believing 
that spiritual interests are always paramount, the institution carefully 
surrounds her students with Christian influences. Every one of the 
Faculty and about ninety per cent of the students are professed 
Christians. Devotional exercises are conducted in the chapel each 
morning by the Faculty. 

While the college is under the control of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, is is not sectarian, and nowhere in the chapel or class room 
is any distinction made in the direction of creed. On the contrary, 
any person of good moral character, irrespective of church affiliaticist 
may become a student in this institution and enjoy all its privileges. 

THE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 
are important factors of the college life. These associations have 
made a rapid and strong growth and are among the most progressive 
in the state. At the coming of the new student, when he is especially 
welcomed and helped, and througout his course, the association 
seeks to throw about him the best influence. Splendid advantages 
are offered in the five years' course of Bible study. Mission study 
classes are maintained. These classes are supported by both associa- 
tions. Weekly religious meetings are held by each association, which 
attract a large number of students. Delegates are sent to each state 
convention and to the summer conference at Lake Geneva, Wis. 
Not only do the associations contribute largely to the religious tone 
of the school, but they add much to the social life. Pleasant receptions 
and socials are given each term by the two associations. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 13 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTION FOR MINISTERS 

Instruction is given to young men preparing for the ministry 
in the history, matter and art of sermon making and in sacred oratory. 
A young men's ministerial association is maintained, sermons are 
preached by the students and every opportunity given to develop 
the ability to preach. 

Special attention is given to effective Scripture and hymn reading. 
Frequent lectures are given by the President and ministers invited 
for this purpose. Historical and Pastoral Theory and Homiletics are 
carefully considered. 

SOCIETIES 

There are four well-sustained literary societies, two for women — 
Sigournean and Castalian, and two for men — Philoneikean and Pho- 
tozetean. They maintain a high standard of literary excellence, while 
giving due prominence to parliamentary drill and to social life. Their 
meetings are held each week. 

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION 

The College maintains an Oratorical association for students in 
the college classes. Contests are held the first Thursday in December. 
First and second prizes are awarded for superiority in thought, style 
and delivery. 

ATHLETICS 

That the physical nature might be developed and an interest in 
athletic fostered, the Moores Hill College Athletic Association was 
reorganized in 1902. The membership is open to all alumni and 
to the students and Faculty of the College. An executive committee 
composed of both student and faculty representatives conducts the 
business of the association. The expenses of membership are placed 
at the minimum and every effort is made by the executive committee, 
through judicious appropriations, to give to the association the largest 
possible returns for the amount thus invested. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

The student body is represented by an organization known as 
the Student Council and composed of representatives of the classes 
of the College and Academy, with one member of the Faculty. The 
following section from the constitution will sufficiently indicate the 
object and scope of the organization: 



14 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

"The Council shall act as the agent of the student body. It 
shall confer with the Faculty and make recommendations to that 
body. It shall consider matters referred to it by the President of 
the College. It shall make recommendations to the student body, and 
in general it shall serve as an executive committee of that body in 
all matters of general student interest." 

PRESS CLUB 

For the special benefit of those who are interested in newspaper 
and magazine work an organization has been effected for fostering 
that kind of talent. The publication of College Life is under the 
supervision of this organization. Correspondence with county and 
daily papers receives special attention. Many additional plans will be 
developed from time to time to train those showing ability in literary 
lines. 

THE CHARLES WILLARD LEWIS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 

The class of 1905, in memory of the late Doctor Charles Willard 
Lewis, formerly President of the College, offers a scholarship each 
year, open to the members of the Junior and Sophomore classes upon 
certain prescribed conditions. Miss Helen Lawyer has held the schol- 
arship the past year. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association is active and loyal. Yearly meetings are 
held with a banquet during commencement week. The members of 
this association are having a large part in the new progressive move- 
ment of the College. 

The alumni of Chicago, Indianapolis and Cincinnati have formed 
local Alumni associations. Their reunions are a source of pleasure 
to the members and foster a loyalty to the institution that is bound to 
widen its influence. 

THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

This organization has for its aim the equipment and improvement 
of college property. Any person paying the membership fee of one 
dollar a year has all the privileges of the society. A thousand women 
ought to enroll at once. Mrs. George W. Wood, Aurora, Ind., is 
President. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 15 

EXPENSES 



BOARD 



Board in private families, $2.75 to $3.00. Rooms furnished, two 
students in a room (fuel and light extra), $2.00 to $3.00 each per month. 
Many students board themselves. Students are advised to consult 
authorities before engaging room and boarding place. 

TUITION— PER TERM 

♦Enrollment Fee $ 1.00 

College Department 15.00 

Academy .' 14.00 

Department of Education 15.00 

Music — Piano, Two Lessons per Week 20.00 

Harmony, Two Lessons per Week 8.00 

Violin or Mandolin, Two Lessons per Week 20.00 

Use of Piano One Hour Daily, per term 1.50 

Voice Culture, Two Lessons per Week 1.50 

Elocution,Two Private Lessons per Week 20.00 

Special Examination 1.00 

Laboratory Fees — 

Chemistry— fee ($3) and deposit ($1) $4.00 

Zoology 2.00 

Botany 1.00 

Physics LOG 

Agriculture 1.00* 

*Note. This fee is remitted to all who enroll and pay tuition or* 
the opening day of each term. 

Tuition and fees are payable in advance. 



ESTIMATED TOTAL EXPENSE FOR THE YEAR, $175 TO 
$250. 



16 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



REGISTRATION 



The day appointed for registration is the opening day of each 
term. No student is admitted to classes unless he has enrolled with 
the Registrar, consulted with the teachers under whom he expects to 
take work and paid his tuition. The enrollment fee of one dollar 
will be remitted to all who enroll and pay tuition on the opening day. 

All applicants for admission should bring statements from their 
high schools or colleges of the subjects pursued therein, the time spent 
upon them and the grades received. It will greatly facilitate enroll- 
ment if this statement is sent to the Registrar in advance. The Col- 
lege furnishes certificates for this purpose to all who apply for them. 

ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

The terms of admission to the Freshman class are in general 
those recommended by the State Board of Education for graduation 
from commissioned high schools. 

Graduates of commissioned high schools will receive Freshman 
standing upon the presentation of certificates showing the studies 
pursued and the time spent upon them . 

Graduates of other high schools, academies or seminaries may 
also receive Freshman standing if such schools are recognized by the 
Faculty of the College. 

Teachers, not graduates of a commissioned high school, who hold 
high grade teachers' licenses, and who present evidences of at least 
three years of successful experience in teaching, will usually be able 
to receive credits equivalent to the elective entrance subjects. Candi- 
dates of this class should bring statements from their superintendents 
showing the time spent in teaching and the grade of success attained. 

The course as outlined for high schools consists of work of four 
years of at least eight months each. A year's work of daily recitations 
in one subject is the unit of measurement. Sixteen units are required 
for entrance to the College. Students coming from high schools where 
a course of not less than nine months is maintained may be admitted 
on the presentation of fifteen units. 

This course should not be confused with the course of study offer- 
ed in the Academy of Moores Hill College. Students who complete 
the Academy course will have met the requirements for admission; 
so, also, will those who have pursued a somewhat different course in 
high schools or other academies. In other words, the requirements for 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 17 

admission to the College and the requirements for graduation from 
the Academy are no necessarily identical. The former are somewhat 
more flexible than the latter. The requirements for admission to the 
College are as follows: 

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS 

1. English, 3 units. English composition and American and 
English Literature. 

2. Mathematics, 2 units. Algebra, including quadratics. Plane 
Geometry. 

3. Foreign Languages, 2 units. Latin, Greek, German or 
French. 

4. History, 1 unit. General or Ancient History. 

5. Science, 1 unit. Physics, Chemistry, Geology, Zoology or 
Botany. 

6. Two units to be obtained by additional work in one or two 
of the above subjects. 

7. Elective, 5 units. 

The elective credits may be from any subjects taught in the 
high school; but students who are preparing for college will secure 
the best results by distributing their elective work as follows: Lan- 
guage, two years; history, one or two years; science, one or two 
years. 

It should be noted that a student may offer the full sixteen units, 
and thus be entitled to Freshman standing who has found it imprac- 
ticable to elect such studies as would enable him to proceed with cer- 
tain Freshman subjects. To meet the needs of such students, especially 
of those who are deficient in a language, the College credits the neces- 
sary sub-Freshman work taken after entrance as collegiate elective 
work. Such an arrangement makes it possible for the student to begin 
Latin, Greek or German in the Freshman year. 

In case the student offers more than the prescribed amount of 
any subject, the excess may be credited to him on his college course. 
The College, however, reserves the right to determine whether or 
not the work presented for additional credit has been of such grade 
as to justify the giving of advanced credit. 

The following paragraphs explain more fully what is accepted 
for entrance in the several subjects. 

1. English — The student at entrance should have a knowledge 
of the principles of English composition and should be able to write 



18 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

clearly, correctly and idiomatically. No student can take up Fresh- 
man work successfully who is seriously deficient in spelling, punctu- 
ation, grammar, sentence structure or paragraphing. 

The work in English and American Literature should include 
a thorough knowledge of the college entrance requirements in English, 
and familiarity with the lives of the authors studied and their relation 
to the history of their times. 

2. Mathematics — The admission requirements in mathematics 
include a knowledge of Algebra and Plane Geometry. The student 
should have paid special attention to factoring, to the use of negative 
and fractional exponents and to the solving of radical and quadratic 
equations. In Geometry considerable attention should be paid to the 
solving of original problems. Those who expect to take college 
mathematics should present Solid Geometry. 

3. Foreign Languages — The minimum requirements in foreign 
languages is two units. The student will find it to his interest to 
present at least five units. No language should be studied for less 
than two years. Language credits may be chosen from the following: 

1. Latin. — (a) Elementary Latin, a year's work, (b) 
Caesar's Gallic War, three to four books, (c) Cicero's 
orations against Catiline and one or two others with 
some of the letters, (d) Virgil's Aeneid, four to six 
books. Prose composition should be taken with the 
Caesar and Cicero. 

2. Greek — (a) A year's work. A beginning Greek 
book, Anabasis, and Greek prose composition, (b) Anab- 
asis cointinued until three to four books are read; 1,500 
to 2,000 lines of Homer's Iliad, prose composition. 

3. German — (a) German grammar, easy prose reading 
and some conversational exercises, (b) Reading of Ger- 
man classics such as Storm's Immensee, Wildenbruch's 
Das Edle Blut, and Hauff's Das Kalte Herz. (c) Read- 
ing of German classics such as Schiller's Maria Stuart 
or Jungfrau von Orleans and Goethe's Hermann und 
Dorothea, (d) German classics such as Goethe's Dich- 
tung and Wahrheit and study of German literature. 

4. French — (a) Studies in pronunciation and gram- 
mar with special attention to the verb; prose and easy 
reading, (b) Reading and composition. The reading 
matter should comprise both literary and scientific selec- 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 19 

4. History — The student may present from one to three years 
of history. If but one year is presented, it should be General History 
or Ancient History. For the second and third years, Modern History, 
English History or a course in American History of high school grade 
may be presented. 

5. Science — The student may present from one to three years 
of science. If but one unit is presented, it should be Physics or 
Botany. Wherever practicable both these subjects should be included 
in the high school work. Credits will alse be received in Chemistry, 
Geology or Zoology. The course in science should be studied in 
connection with good laboratory facilities. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The College of Liberal Arts offers three courses of study: 

The Classical Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
This course is designed for those who wish to put emphasis on the 
ancient languages. The electives, however, afford an excellent oppor- 
tunity for acquiring a general knowledge of a wide range of subjects. 

The Scientific Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science. Emphasis is placed in this course on the physical sciences 
and modern languages. 

The Literary Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Letters. Emphasis is placed in this course upon the modern lan- 
guages, literature and history. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The term hour is the unit used in reckoning the amount of work 
required for graduation. This unit consists of one class exercise a 
week in a study, continued throughout a term. The student is 
expected to complete sixteen of these term hours each term of the first 
two years of his course and fourteen each term of the last two years. 

Each candidate for a Bachelor's degree must complete before 
graduation one hundred and eighty term-hours of collegiate work in 
some one of the courses outlined below. 

In addition to this requirement, each student is required to 
take during his Freshman and Sophomore years, six hours in the 
Department of Physical Education, or an equivalent permitted by the 
Faculty. Two class exercises each week will count as one hour. 

The studies required for graduation are prescribed and elective. 
In the Classical Course one hundred and eighty hours are pre- 
scribed, in the Scientific one hundred and twenty-eight and in the 
Literary one hundred and twenty-eight. The remaining hours neces- 



20 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

sary to make up one hundred and eighty term-hours are elective under 
the following rules: 

The selection of any elective must have the approval of the head 
of the department from which the selection is made. 

No credit will be given for less than an entire course in any 
elective subject. 

The studies prescribed in one course are elective in those in 
which they are not prescribed. 

Studies not prescribed in any course are open to all students, 
under restrictions stated in connection with the description of the 
studies. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

It is the endeavor of the institution to maintain a high standard 
of scholarship. To this end no student is permitted to take more than 
four studies (sixteen hours in the College, twenty in the Academy) 
without Faculty consent. A student whose average grade the previous 
term has been below 85 per cent will not be granted the privilege of 
extra studies. The following plan is followed in connection with 
requests for extra studies: 

1. Any student in College or Academy desiring to take more than 
regular work shall file with the adviser a written request in duplicate, 
containing a term-by-term program for the time for which extra work 
is desired, this request to be filed, whenever possible, before the close 
of the term preceding that for which extra work is asked. 

2. The action of the committee on extra studies shall be recorded 
on the duplicate application, one copy to be given to the student and 
the other to be retained by the committee. 

3. No extra subject shall be put on enrollment blank until granted 
by the committee and then only on presentation at office of approved 
request. 

4. All students shall be strongly urged to plan their courses in 
full with advisers not later than the beginning of the sophomore year, 
but no encouragement shall be given to any plan involving extra 
hours previous to action of the committee on extra studies. 

In all departments of the College and Academy, written examin- 
ations are given at the close of each term, and special tests at the 
option of the teachers are held at irregular intervals during the term. 
A grade not lower than 75 per cent is necessary to advancement; 
students who make as high as 70 per cent are conditioned. The 
daily grade of each student counts three-fourths of the term standing, 
and the examination one-fourth. Students who are conditioned have 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 21 

the privilege of removing the condition by taking a special exam- 
ination any time within six weeks of the opening of the term following 
the one in which the condition was received. 

The grades of students are sent to parents or guardians at the 
close of each term. 

For examinations at other than the regular time, students must 
present to the instructor a written permission from the President's 
office. A fee of one dollar is charged for such examinations. 

In view of the fact that the college places emphasis upon class 
work, absences should be as few as possible. Students who are 
absent from recitation by reason of absence from town are excused 
at the President's office. In other cases the teacher has the power 
of excuse. All excuses must be presented at the first recitation after 
the student has returned to the class. Students having three unex- 
cused absences may be dropped from the class. 

The College does not encourage work in absentia by undergrad- 
uate students. In exceptional cases a limited amount of work may 
be done in this way. All applications are given careful consideration 
by a committee of the Faculty and must receive Faculty action before 
the work is undertaken. Examinations as a rule will be taken at 
the College, but by special arrangement they may be taken under 
a third party at the home of the student. A charge of three dollars 
a subject per term is made for the necessary directions and exam- 
inations. 

PARALLEL COURSES 

The studies in the parallel courses are designated by the Roman 
numerals, which refer to the departments of the College of Liberal 
Arts, described under Departments of the College, page 27 and by 
letters, which refer to sub-divisions of the departments. The figures 
in parentheses designate the number of recitations a week in each 
term. Unless otherwise specified, a study continues throughout the 
year. 



22 



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Moores Hill College Bulletin 25 

DEPARTMENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



I. English Bible. 

II. Ancient Languages. 

III. Modern Languages. 

IV. English and History. 

V. Political and Social Science. 

VI. Physical Sciences. 
VII. Mathematics. 

VIII. Philosophy. 

IX. Education. 

X. Music. 

XI. Art. 

XII. Public Speaking. 

XIII. Physical Education. 

XIV. Graduate Department. 

I— ENGLISH BIBLE 

President King 
Dr. Roeertson 

The following courses are offered. Course A or B is prescribed 
for Freshmen in all courses. 

A. Biblical Literature. — The Messages of the Bible, by 
Sanders and Kent, are used for reference. The object is to secure 
the general understanding of the plan, purpose and message of the 
Bible. Alternates with Course B. Two hours a week for the year. 
Offered in 1915-16. 

B. Biblical History. — Alternates wtih Course A. Two hours a 
week for the year. Offered in 1914-15. 

C. Homiletics. — Prescribed for all students under license to 
preach and especially recommended to all students preparing for the 
Christian ministry. Lectures on preparation and delivery of sermons, 
sermon outlining and practical problems of ministerial interest will 
be given, with class discussion. One hour a week for the year. 
College credit for one hour will be given. 



26 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

ll—ANCIENT LANGUAGES 

Professor Aldrich 

Miss Stevens 

I. LATIN 

A. Freshman Latin. — Livy, Book I or XXI; Cicero, Caio 
Major and Laelius; Horace, Odes and Epodes. Throughout the course 
questions of thought and style and of literary and historical value are 
made prominent with sight reading throughout the year. Prescribed 
for classical students, elective for others. Four hours a week for 
a year. 

B. Sophomore Latin. — Horace, Satires and Epistles; Tacitus, 
Germania and Agricola; Terence; Plautus. By a careful and de- 
tailed study of the art of Horace and Tacitus, an effort is made to 
help the student to a clearer understanding and appreciation of 
stylistic significance and a greater enjoyment of all literary master- 
pieces, while attention is given in the study of the latter author to 
the history of the times. In the last half of the year the development 
of the Roman Comedy is traced and the meters are studied. One 
play of Terence and several of Plautus are read. Prescribed for 
classical students unless Greek B or C is taken, in which case it is 
elective; elective for others. Four hous a week for a year. 

C. Junior Latin. — Selections from Suetonius, Pliny, Juvenal, 
Lucretius, Martial, with rapid reading of Virgil's Eclogues and Cat- 
ullus. The style and literary value of the author are considered 
and Roman life is constantly studied as revealed in these authors 
through the religion, philosophy and daily habits of the people. 
Elective for classical and literary students. Four hours a week for 
a year. 

In general Latin B and C will not be offered the same year, but 
will alternate or be combined according to the needs and desires 
of the students. Latin C was taught in 1912-13. 

II. GREEK 

a. Beginning Greek. — Beginning Greek two terms; Xenophon's 
Anabasis one term; Greek Prose Composition, once a week during the 
spring term. Candidates for the A. B. degree, who have not pre- 
sented Greek for admission, are required to take this sub-Freshman 
course, but receive credit for it as college elective. Elective for 
scientific and literary students. Five hours a week for a year. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 27 

b. Anabasis — Iliad. — Anabasis, for the first half year; Iliad, 
last half. Prose composition, weekly, first half. Prescribed and 
elective on same terms as Course A. Five hours a week for a year. 
Courses A and B are described more fully in work of the Academy. 

A. Freshman Greek. — Odyssey, three books; Selections from 
Herodotus and Thucydides; Apology and part of Phaedo; Xeno- 
phon's Memorabilia or Greek Lyric Poets. In reading the Odyssey 
an effort is made to have the student catch the spirit and view-point 
of the age and writer that he may more fully appreciate and enjoy 
the charm of the poem. The history and philosophy of Greece are 
carefully noted in connection with the prose authors of this course. 
Prescribed for classical, elective for literary students. Four hours a 
week for a year. 

B. Greek Drama. — Two terms are given to tragedy, three of 
the following dramas being read: The Alcestis, Medea of Euripides, 
Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannus, Prometheus Bound, Agamemnon. In 
the spring term Aristophanes is read. The development of Greek 
dramatic poetry, its function in the national life and its influence 
upon subsequent literature are themes of study and investigation. 
Prescribed for all classical students unless Latin B or C is taken, in 
which case it is elective. Elective for literary students. Four hours 
a week for a year. 

C. Greek Oratory — New Testament. — The first half of the 
year is given to the consideration of Greek oratory; Demosthenes' 
De Corona is studied, with collateral reading of Lysias. During the 
last half of the year the New Testament Greek is studied with some 
investigation of Hellenistic and Patristic Greek. Elective for clas- 
sical and literary students. Four hours a week for a year. 

In general Greek B and C will not be offered the same year, 
but will alternate or be combined to meet the needs and dsires of 
the class. 

Ill— MODERN LANGUAGES 

Professor Ficken 

I. GERMAN 

A year of German is prescribed for Freshmen in the Scientific 
Course. This may be either (c,2), (d) or A, according to previous 
preparation. It should also be noted that candidates for the B. S. 
degree who have not presented German for admission are required 
to take courses (a), (b), and (c), but receive credit for this sub- 



28 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

Freshman work as college elective. All courses in German are open 
as electives to students in the Classical and Literary Courses. The 
following courses are offered: 

a. Elementary German. — A careful study of the Grammar, 
together with much prose work and some conversational exercises. 
Wesselhoeft's Elementary German Grammar is the text during the 
first and second terms; Manley's Ein Sommer in Deutschland is read 
in the third term in connection with prose work. Five hours a week 
for a year. A four-hour college credit. 

b. Modern German Prose. — This course makes practical appli- 
cation of the principles studied in course (a) by showing how the 
best writers have employed them. Reading of 400 to 500 pages of 
Nineteenth Century prose as found in Storm's Immensee, Wildenbruch's 
Das Edle Blut and Der Lezte, Heyse's L'Arrabbiata, Hauff's Das Kalte 
Herz, Gerstaecker's Germelshausen, etc. Constant drill in the essen- 
tials of syntax. Prose composition one hour a week throughout the 
year. Conversational and dictation exercises. Five hours a week for 
a year. A four-hour college credit. 

c. 1. Classics. — Reading of Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, Jungfrau 
von Orleans or Maria Stuart; Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea or 
Egmont; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm or Emilia Galotti. A study 
of three of these classics with collateral reading constitutes a year's 
work. Conversational and dictation exercises throughout the year. 
Five hours a week for a year. A four-hour college credit. Alternates 
with c, 2. Offered in 1914-15. 

c, 2. Scientific German. — This course is designed to acquaint 
the student with the terminology or scientific language and to enable 
him to read intelligently scientific treatises. Carefully graded texts 
are used; Gore's German Science Reader, Blochmann's Scientific 
German, Walther's Meereskunde, Brandt and Day's German Scien- 
tific Reading, Dippold's Scientific German, etc. 500 to 600 pages 
constitute a year's work. Dictation exercises. Alternates with c, 1. 
Offered in 1915-16. Required of all candidates for the B. S. degree. 
Elective for others. 

d. Classics — Literary History — Reading of German Classics. 
Schiller's Wallenstein, Goethe's Dichtung und Wahrheit, and Lessing's 
Nathan der Weise, or equivalents. A study of German literature 
based upon Priest's/f/j/orv of German Literature. Conversational and 
dictation exercises. Five hours a week for a year. A four-hour 
college credit. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 29 

A. German Literature. — A study of the works of Lessing, 
Goethe and Schiller and their places in German literature. The 
purpose of this course is to enable the student to understand the 
text without translating and to appreciate the literature in the 
original. Open to students who have had courses (a), (b), (c) and 
(d), or equivalent. Four hours a week for a year. 

II. FRENCH 

A. Elementary French. — Studies in pronunciation and grammar 
with special attention to the verb ; prose and easy reading. Fraser 
and Squair's Shorter French Course is the text and Talbot's Le 
Francais et Sa Patrie is used as a reader. Prescribed for Freshmen 
in Scientific and Literary Courses. Elective in all other courses. Four 
hours a week for a year. 

B. Reading and Composition. — (1) A variety of literary work 
will be read. Merimee's Colomba, Moliere's Comedies, Sand's La 
Mare au Diable, Dumas' La Tulipe Noire, etc. (2) Scientific French. 
Bowen's reader or equivalent is used. Course (1) is given during 
fall and spring terms and Course (2) during the winter term. Com- 
position work and dictation exercises during the year. The work is 
so arranged that the student may do second year reading one year and 
third year work the next, and vice versa. Prescribed for Sophomores 
in Scientific and Literary Courses. Elective for all other students 
who have had course A. Four hours a week. 

IV— ENGLISH AND HISTORY 

Professor Torbet 
and assistants 

I. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

A. Rhetoric and Composition. — A course in theoretical and 
practical composition. Special emphasis on themes. Prescribed for 
Freshmen in all courses. Two hours a week for a year. 

B. General Introduction to English Literature. — History of 
English Literature with studies in Spenser, Shakespeare, Wordsworth, 
Shelley, Keats, Tennyson and Browning. Collateral reading as 
prescribed by the instructor. Prescribed for Sophomores in all courses. 
Students below this grade will not be admitted to this course without 
the consent of the instructor. Four hours a week for a year. 

C. English Prose. — Studies from the leading prose writers with 
special attention to style. Open to students who have completed 



30 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

Courses A and B. Required of students in the Literary Course, 
elective for others. Two hours a week for a year. Offered in 1915-16. 
D. Literary Criticism. — A study of the principles of criticism 
with practical exercises in their application to the various literary 
forms. Open to students who have completed Courses A and B. 
Required of students in the Literary Course, elective for others. Two 
hours a week for a year. Offered in 1914-15. 

II. HISTORY 

A. History of England. — A study of the growth of the English 
nation, with special attention to the development of constitutional 
principles. Prescribed for Sophomores in all courses, and not open to 
students below this grade. Two hours a week for a year. 

B. American History. — A study of the history of our own 
country, with special attention to the formation and development of 
the constitution. Open to students who have completed Course A. 
Required of students in the Literary Course, elective for others. Two 
hours a week for a year. Offered in 1915-16. 

C. History of Modern Europe. — A brief survey of the mediaeval 
period, followed by a careful study of the modern age. Open to 
students who have had Course A. Required of students in the 
Literary Course, elective for others. Two hours a week for a year. 
Offered in 1914-15. 

V— POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Torbet 

The work in this department includes courses in International 
Law, Economics and Sociology. 

A. International Law. — This course alternates with the course 
in Astronomy. One of these subjects is prescribed for Seniors in the 
Classical and Literary Courses. International Law is elective for 
those who do not take it as a requirement. Four hours a week for 
the first term. Offered in 1915-16. 

B. Economics. — An introductory course for students of advanced 
grade. Seager's Briefer Course is used as a text. Prescribed for 
Seniors in the Classical and Literary Courses. Elective for other 
students. Four hours a week for the second term. 

C. Sociology — A course in general Sociology for students of 
advanced grade. Prescribed for Seniors in the Classical and Literary 
Courses. Elective for others. Four hours a week for the third term. 



:: Moores Hill College Bulletin 31 

VI— PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY 

Professor Bigney 

I. BIOLOGY 

A. A year's course in college Botany will be offered when the 
demand is sufficient. 

B. Zoology. — This course is devoted to a consideration of the 
habits, morphology, physiology, reproduction and embryology of 
representative animals, including both invertebrates and vertebrates. 
Methods of technique are taught, giving the student practice in the 
fundamentals of research work. The economic phase of Zoology 
receives careful attention. In the spring term bird study is em- 
phasized. The principles of organic evolution are also studied, and 
the history of Zoology presented. Prescribed for juniors in the 
Scientific Course. Elective for other students. Two hours a week 
in recitation and four hours in the laboratory for the entire year. 

C. Histology and Physiology. — A study of the various tissues 
of the representative mammals and of the methods of staining, mount- 
ing, sectioning and other methods of scientific investigation. The 
functions of these tissues and the various organs of the human body 
are considered. Two hours a week in recitation and four hours in 
the laboratory for the first and second terms. Elective in all courses. 

D. Embryology. — The study of the development of the frog is 
first taken up, then a more detailed study of the embryology of the 
chick. Two hours in recitation and four hours in the laboratory for 
the third term. Elective in all courses. Continuous with Course C. 

E. Advanced Embryology. — A course continuous with D, but a 
more comprehensive study of chick and pig. 

II. GEOLOGY 

A. Geology. — The first six weeks is spent in the study of min- 
erals. Identification of the chief minerals and rocks is emphasized. 

The remainder of the year is given to Dynamical, Structural 
and Historical Geology. The study of specimens and the U. S. 
Geological Survey Atlases illustrating the geographical principles con- 
stitute an important feature of the work. Prescribed for Seniors in 
Scientific Course. Elective for other student. A year's course. 

III. ASTRONOMY 

A. Astronomy. — The fixed stars, the planets, moons, comets, 
meteors and nebulae are thoroughly studied. The location of the 



32 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

constellations receives special attention. The College owns a fine V/2 
inch telescope mounted with clock attachment and declination and 
right ascension circle. A splendid spectroscope has also been added 
to the equipment. This subject alternates with International Law and 
is prescribed for those who do not take International Law. Offered in 
1914-15. 

MUSEUM 

Professor A. J. Bigney, Curator 
Mr. F. W. Gottlieb, Assistant Curator, Morristoivn, Ind. 

The Museum contains a good working collection of specimens. 
Geology is represented by the numerous corals, echinoderms, brachi- 
opods, bryozoa, lamellibranchs, gasteropods, cephalopods, trilobites 
and the leading minerals and rocks from many parts of the United 
States. The vicinity is very rich in Ordovician fossils. 

In archeology the collection is represented by many mounted 
birds, also a goodly number of bird skins, mounted mammals and 
hundreds of specimens in preservatives adapted to the needs in botany, 
zoology, histology and physiology. 

The collection has been accumulating for fifty years. Friends 
have made donations from year to year which are very useful and are 
greatly appreciated. The College solicits specimens and collections 
from friends. The College can be made a depository for such material 
and thus it can be made of highest usefulness. 

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

Professor Phillips 
Mr. Krick 

A. Inorganic Chemistry. — A course of experimental laboratory 
work with recitations, on general and descriptive chemistry, forming 
a basis for advanced study in Sophomore and Junior Courses. It is 
so arranged that it gives sufficient general knowledge of chemistry 
for students taking Qualitative Analysis in the spring term. The 
laboratory work is an adjunct of the recitation course; it includes 
manipulation of apparatus, experiments illustrating the principles of 
stochiometry, a study of the laws of chemical action and the prepara- 
tion, of the most important elements and compounds, with a study of 
their properties. The relation of chemistry to the commercial world 
is kept constantly in mind. Prescribed for Sophomores in all courses. 
Two hours a week in recitation and four hours in the laboratory for 
the first and second terms. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 33 

B. Qualitative Analysis. — Methods for the determination of 
metals and acids are taught by laboratory practice, consisting princi- 
pally of elementary basic qualitative analysis. Prescribed for Sopho- 
mores in all courses. One recitation and eight hours in the laboratory 
for the third term. Open to all students who have completed Course A* 

C. Organic Chemistry. — An elementary study in organic analysis 
and in the preparation of leading organic compounds. Special atten- 
tion is given to the theoretical principles involved in the commercial 
manufacture of organic products. Elective in all courses for students 
who have had Course A and B. Two hours a week in recitation and 
five hours in laboratory for the year. 

D. Quantitative Analysis. — A course in Quantitative Analysis 
for advanced students. Elective. 

A. Physics. — An advanced course in general physics is given 
when the demand requires it. 

VII— MATHEMATICS 

Professor Smith 
and Assistants 

A. (1) College Algebra. — Since a thorough knowledge of 
Algebra is necessary as a basis for the work in higher mathematics, 
it is thought advisable to place this subject first in the course. An 
advanced text is used and the following topics are emphasized: Fac- 
toring, linear and quadratic equations, graphs, determinants, theory 
of equations, exponents, surds, imaginaries, progressions and the 
binomial theorem. Four hours a week for the first term and first 
half of the second term. 

(2) Trigonometry. — The work in Plane Trigonometry is ex- 
haustive, dealing with the functions of angles and their relations, the 
development and manipulation of formulas and the solution of the 
right and oblique triangles, with practical applications. In Spherical 
Trigonometry the student is held to the development of the formulas, 
the application of Napier's rules, the interpretation of Gauss's equa- 
tions and Napier's analogies and their application to the general 
triangle, and to both terrestrial and celestial computations. Four 
hours a week for the second half of the second term and throughout 
the third term. 

Mathematics A is prescribed for Freshmen in the Scientific 
Course, elective in the other courses. 

B. (1) Surveying. — Students are required to do actual work in 
surveying, triangulation and leveling. Special emphasis is placed 



34 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

upon correct methods of computation and arrangement of data. Four 
hours a week for the first term. 

(2) Analytical Geometry. — This course includes the study of 
the point, straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse and hyperbola, with 
exercises. Four hours a week for the second and third terms. 

Mathematics B is elective in all courses for students who have 
had Course A. 

C. Calculus. — Differential Calculus is offered during the first 
and second terms and Integral Calculus during the third term. Four 
hours a week. Elective in all courses for students who have had 
Courses A and B. 

VIM—PHILOSOPHY 

President King 
Professor Reibold 

The following courses are offered. A, B and C, or D, E and F, 
are prescribed for Juniors in the Classical Course; A and B, or D 
and E, for Juniors in the Scientific and Literary Courses. Those who 
have completed A or D may elect any of the other courses not taken 
by them as prescribed work. Courses A, B and C will be offered in 
1915-16. Courses D, E and F will be offered in 1914-15. 

A. Psychology. — A course covering the general field of psy- 
chology. Four hours a week for the first term. 

B. History of Philosophy — This course covers the general field 
of philosophy. Four hours a week for the second term. Extensive 
readings and reports are required. Roger's History of Philosophy is 
used. 

C. Logic. — The relation of Logic to Psychology; the study of the 
mental states functioning in Logic and the practical application of the 
laws of Logic form the basis for the work of this term. Creighton's 
Introduction to Logic is used as text. Four hours a week for the third 
term. 

D. Psychology. — Same as Course A. 

E. Metaphysics. — A study of the fundamental conceptions of 
reality. Reo 4 uired readings. Four hours a week for the second term. 
Text, Bowne. 

F. Ethics. — This term's work presents a study of the principles 
of Ethics as shown in an analysis of life. The minimum amount of 
emphasis is placed upon the histories and criticisms of doctrines; the 
maximum amount upon morality directly. Perry's Moral Economy is 
used as text. Readings from Paulsen, Bowne, Thilly. Four hours a 

or the third term. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 35 

IX— EDUCATION 

Professor Reibold 
Professor Reagan 

The department of education is regularly organized as a depart- 
ment of the College of Liberal Arts. All professional courses may 
be counted toward a college degree. 

Work will be presented from the teacher's standpoint in the 
following subjects: Arithmetic, grammar, geography, physiology, 
nature study and agriculture. 

The following professional courses are offered. Each course 
extends over a period of twelve weeks and gives a five-hour credit: 

I. PSYCHOLOGY 

A. The work of this course will consist of a general study of 
the subject matter of Psychology as applied to the science of teaching. 
Text, Thorndyke. 

B. The purpose of Course B is to give particular attention to 
the study of the different phases of consciousness. Text, Angell. 

II. METHODS 

A. This course deals with education as to its nature; the school 
as an institution; the theories of mental activities and general methods. 

B. In Course B the general conception of methods is applied to 
the branches of the course of study. Both courses pre-suppose the 
corresponding courses in Psychology. 

III. HISTORY OF EDUCATION 

A. Course A will give a study of types of oriental people as to 
their education and a study of the education of the Greeks and 
Romans. Monroe's History of Education, ' 

B. This term's work covers the education of the people of 
Europe as seen in the Renaissance, the Reformation, the growth of 
Universities and the rise of the school system. Monroe's History of 
Education. 

IV. OBSERVATION 

A. The work will consist of observation of work done by critic 
teachers ; discussion of the elements in the structure of lessons 
observed; assignment; reference work and discussion of work 
observed. 

B. Work is given in observation. The aim of this course is to 
give the student skill in organizing and interpreting lessons. 



-56 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

Course For Teachers of Class A 

Two subjects from the following: Psychology A, History of 
Education A, Methods A, Observation A. One subject from the 
common branches. One elective from the common branches or 
advanced subjects. Vocal Music or Drawing. 

Course For Teachers of Class B 

Two subjects from the following: Psychology B, History of 
Education B, Methods B, Observation B. One subject from the com- 
mon ranches. One elective from the common branches or advanced 
-subjects. Vocal Music or Drawing. 

X— MUSIC 

Mrs. Williams 
v. Miss Moynahan 

Mrs. Wilcox 

Recognizing the value of music as a culture study, the College 
permits candidates for a Bachelor's degree to elect work from the 
Department of Music. The equivalent of twelve term-hours may be 
counted toward a degree. 

XI— ART 

Miss Sherrod 

The following courses are offered: 

A. Freehand Drawing. — A study of perspective and work with 
pencil and brush in drawing objects, cast and nature. 

B. Public School Drawing. — Especially for teachers who are 
expected to teach drawing in schools. A study of the type, forms, 
mechanical drawing of patterns and constructive designs. Work in 
decorating and designing. 

XII —PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Miss Ritter 

A course in public speaking extending over one year, two hours 
a week is prescribed for Sophomores in all courses. A fee of two 
dollars per term is charged. In addition candidates for a degree 
may elect in public speaking the equivalent of six term-hours. For 
description of courses see Department of Public Speaking, page 51. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 37 

XII!— PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mr. McKain 
Miss Burlingame 

Candidates for a Bachelor's Degree are required to complete 
during their Freshman and Sophomore years six hours in physical 
education. Two gymnasium periods a week for a term count as one 
hour. The following is a statement of the work offered: 

Instruction in Physical Education is given during the entire 
college course, personal attention being given to the individul needs 
of the students. The training is based upon the Delsarte Philosophy 
of Expression, supplemented by both the German and Swedish sys- 
tems of gymnastics. Exercises are given to secure symmetrical de- 
velopment of the body and to overcome such defect's as incorrect 
poise, uneven or round shoulders, and any faults in the carriage of 
the body. The work of the first year includes dumb bells, wands, 
balls, breathing exercises, exercises for the purpose of overcoming 
stiffness, for developing control of the muscles, etc. Basket ball also 
plays an important part in the gymnasium work. 

The work of the second year is an outgrowth of that of the first 
year. It aims to embrace more artistic work in harmony and 
spontaneous expression. Indian clubs, basket ball and balls will be 
used; work in flexing and energizing will be given. 

The results expected from those who have had a full course in 
Physical Education are: Ease, freedom and grace in standing and 
walking; freedom from seif-consciousness, and ease and precision in 
all movements of the body. 

On account of the increasing demand for a knowledge of Physical 
Education on the part of teachers, a class is organized for the Depart- 
ment of Education. The intention is to give the students a certain 
amount of drill in exercises which can be used in schools where 
appliances are not at hand. The bearing of these exercises upon the 
health, physique and bodily control is brought out during the entire 
course in Physical Training. 

Special attention is given to private pupils in this department. 
There is no physical deformity, however great, that cannot be over- 
come, either wholly or partially, by systematic, well directed practice, 
and to those suffering from curvature of the spine, weak lungs, unde- 
veloped voice, heart trouble, stooping shoulders, knock knees and the 
like, a thorough course in this department is recommended. 

Private classes for ladies and children will be organized at the 
beginning of each term. 



38 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

XIV— GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

Advanced courses of study adapted to the needs of graduate stu- 
dents are offered in most of the departments of the College. The 
work of graduate students is under the supervision of a standing 
committee of the Faculty. 

The following are the regulations pertaining to this department: 

1. Any person who has a Bachelor's degree in the College, or 
any other approved school, may become a candidate for the corres- 
ponding Master's degree. 

2. Candidates for an advanced degree must register for their 
work before it is undertaken. The work must be done in residence. 

3. Application must be made to the Faculty within six weeks 
after the opening of any given year. Blank forms for application 
will be furnished by the President or Registrar. 

4. The work required will be the equivalent of a year's study, 
forty-five hours. At least one-half of the work must be taken from 
a department of study in which the candidate has completed at least 
the undergraduate requirement in Moores Hill College, or its equiva- 
lent. The rest of the work must be taken from not more than two 
departments. 

5. Candidates for a Bachelor's degree who, during their under- 
graduate course devote their excess of time to such advanced studies 
as may be approved by the Committee on Graduate Study, may have 
such work credited towards a Master's degree. Such approval should 
be secured previous to taking up the studies. Otherwise the Committee 
will be under no obligation to accept the work as post-graduate credit. 

6. The tuition for the Master's degree is fifteen dollars a term. 
A diploma fee of five dollars additional is charged. 

7. Any person who has received a Bachelor's degree in Moores 
Hill College, or from any other approved school, may, upon the com- 
pletion or an additional year of study, receive a second Bachelor's 
degree. 

Moores Hill College offers no course leading to the Ph. D. degree, 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 39 

ACADEMY 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The special work of the Academy is (1) to prepare young men 
and women for the College of Liberal Arts and (2) to furnish high 
school training for those who cannot take a college course, but wish 
to prepare themselves for professional study, for business or for 
teaching in the public schools. 

The Academy is certified by the State Board of Education to do 
the work of a commissioned high school. Therefore, our graduates 
from the Academy meet the requirements of the law which provides 
that all teachers entering the profession after August 1, 1903, must be 
high school graduates. Students have all the advantages to be derived 
from the extensive apparatus, the laboratories, the library, the reading 
room and the literary societies connected with the College of Liberal 
Arts. It is possible also for the student who so desires to take special 
courses in music, physical culture and elocution. 

Students in the Academy are under the direct instruction and care 
of the Faculty of the College of Liberal Arts. In case it becomes 
necessary to employ undergraduate instructors only those of marked 
ability will be engaged. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Candidates for admission to the Academy are expected to present 
evidence of good moral character. To begin the work of the first 
year students should have completed the common English branches. 
They should bring certificates of graduation from the eighth grade or 
of promotion to the high school. Students who do not have such 
certificates will usually be admitted without examination to the class 
for which they seem to be adapted, but unsatisfactory work will 
subject the student to loss of rank. 

Candidates for advanced standing should present certificates 
showing the amount of work done, the time spent upon it, and the 
grade. Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the 
Registrar of the College. 

PRE-ACADEMIC CLASSES 

To meet the needs of students who are deficient in common 
branches, classes are formed in arithmetic, grammar, geography, etc. 
Every opportunity will be given the student in these classes to advance 
as raoidlv as he mav be able. 



40 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

NORMAL INSTRUCTION 

Special provision will be made for teachers and others who wish 
advanced work in the common branches. Classes will be maintained 
in all branches required in the examination for license to teach. For 
the announcement of professional courses, see Department of Educa- 
tion, page 35. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

The course of study extends through four years. Teachers and 
others who give satisfactory evidence of having done thoroughly a 
part of the work before entering will be credited with that work. 

Students of mature years, and those who show marked ability in 
their studies, will be permitted to complete their preparation as 
speedily as may be desired. In the majority of cases, however, the 
student will find the four years none too short a time in which to lay 
the foundation for his subsequent work. 

OUTLINE OF STUDY 

All classes in the Academy continue throughout the year unless 
otherwise specified. The number of recitations per week in each 
subject is indicated in figures. The letters following the subjects 
refer to the outline of courses as found on following pages of this 
catalogue. 

FIRST YEAR 

English (a) Grammar, Composition and Classics (5) 

Foreign Language Latin (a) or German (a) (5) 

Science (a) Botany (4) 

Mathematics (a) Algebra (5) 

Drawing (1) 

SECOND YEAR 

English (b) Composition and Classics (4) 

Foreign Language Latin or German (5) 

Mathematics (b) Algebra and Plane Geometry (5) 

History (a) Ancient History (5) 

Mathematics (b) Algebra and Plane Geometry (5) 

Music or Drawing (1) 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 41 



THIRD YEAR 






Required work : llll 

English (c) Composition, American Literature (4) 

Foreign Language Latin or German (5) 

Mathematics (c) Plane or Solid Geometry (5) 

Music or Drawing (1) 
One of the following: 

History (b) Modern History 

Agriculture 

A second foreign language: Latin, Greek or German 

FOURTH YEAR 

Required work : - 

English (d) Composition, English Literature (4) 

Foreign Language Latin, Greek or German (5) 

Science (b) Physics (5) 

Music or Drawing (1) 
One of the following: 

History (c) U. S. History and Civics 

Science (c) Physical Geography and Physiology 

Agriculture 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The student is expected to take four subjects and music or draw- 
ing each year. Extra studies may not be taken without the consent of 
the Faculty. Students whose average grade for the previous term has 
been below 85 per cent will not be permitted extra work. For extra 
studies an additional charge is made. Other general regulations in 
regard to examinations, reports, absences, etc., are the same as for the 
College of Arts. See page 20. 

Diplomas are awarded to those students who complete sixteen 
units of work, a year's work of daily recitations in one subject being 
the unit of measurement. A diploma fee of two dollars is charged. 

The following more specific requirements and suggestions are 
made in order that the student may get the best results from his course: 

1. All candidates for a diploma must complete four years of 
English, four of foreign language, three of mathematics, one of 
history and two of science, in accordance with the outline above. 
Music and drawing must also be taken as indicated, with the further 
condition that no student may be graduated with less than two years 
of music. Membership in the chorus (see page 49) is open to 



42 Moores Kill College Bulletin 

approved students of the third and fourth years and satisfies the 

music requirement for these years. 

2. Those who expect to take the Classical Course in the College 
should take four years of Latin and two of Greek; those who expect 
to take the Scientific or Literary Course will find it to their advantage 
to take at least three years of German and an equal amount of Latin. 
Literary students should elect a second year of history. 

3. Those who are looking forward to the teaching of any foreign 
language before completing a college course will do well to take four 
years in that language with two years in some other foreign language. 

4. The student is expected to advise with the member of the 
Faculty designated as adviser for the Academy, and his choice of 
electives is subject to the approval of that officer under such regula- 
tions as may be established by the Faculty. 

ENGLISH 

'English (a). — A review of the principles of English grammar. 
Elementary composition both oral and written; reading and study of 
representative selections from American and English authors. Thomas 
and Howe's Rhetoric and Composition. 

English (b) A continuation of English (a), with special atten- 
tion to theme writing. An average of at least one exercise a week 
throughout the year is given to the study of such masterpieces as 
Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Llawthorne's The House of Seven 
Gables, Eliot's Silas Marner and Milton's Minor Poems. 

English (c). — A continuation of English (b) for the first term. 
During the second and third terms American Literature is studied 
Theme work throughout the year. 

English (d). — During the first term special attention is given to 
argumentation. English literary history with a study of masterpieces 
constitute the major part of the work for the second and third terms. 
Theme work is continued with the object of thoroughly grounding the 
student in the principles and practice of English composition. 

LATIN ANG GREEK 

Three objects are kept in view in the Academy Latin and Greek. 
First, to give that mental training for which these languages are 
preeminently adapted. Second, to lay such a thorough foundation 
that the student can read his college classics with an appreciation of 
their literary values as world masterpieces. Third, to help him 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 43 

acquire correctness and proficiency in the use of the English language 
and a better understanding of its literature. To this end constant 
emphasis is put upon choice wording in translation, while comparisons 
are made with similar English productions and English derivatives 
are noted. 

LATIN 

Four years of Latin, five recitations a week are taught in the 
Academy. 

Latin (a). — Smith and Laing's First Latin Lessons is studied 
throughout the year. Frequent reviews and constant drills in the 
forms gone over are given. The last few weeks are spent in reading 
the Caesar which is included in the book. 

Latin (b). — Selections from Caesar's Gallic War, in amount from 
four to five books. Constant drills in form and syntax and systematic 
study of Latin Grammar are kept up throughout the year. Prose 
composition is studied in three ways. First, by prepared written 
exercises, one a week, second by frequent oral exercises and third by 
class writing of Latin sentences at the dictation of the teacher from 
the lesson text as a basis; the total amount of Prose being equivalent 
to two exercises a week throughout the year. 

Latin (c). — Six orations of Cicero and from fifteen to twenty 
of his letters are read. Thorough drill in form and syntax is kept 
up and increasing emphasis is laid upon the literary and historical 
value of matter read. Sallust's Catiline or Selections from Ovid may 
be substituted for two of the orations. Prose Composition is continued 
weekly throughout the year. 

Latin (d). — Six books of Virgil's Aeneid are read. Much 
attention is given to the metrical reading, the literary features and 
the mythology of the poem. Selections from the Eclogues or from 
Catullus' poems may be substituted for the fifth book of the Aeneid. 
Practice in sight reading is given throughout courses (b), (c) and (d). 

GREEK 

Two years of Greek should be taken in the Academy by those 
electing classical work. But students who are graduates of approved 
high schools or the Academy will be admitted to the Freshman class 
and allowed to take this Greek as college elective. 

Greek (a). — During the first two terms a beginning Greek book 
is studied. In the third term Xenophon's Anabasis is read with 
weekly exercises in Greek Prose Composition. 



44 Mcores Hill College Bulletin 

Greek (b). — The Anabasis and Prose Composition are continued 
during the first half of the second year. From three to four books 
of the Anabasis are read with constant drill and continuous review 
of form and syntax. The first half of the second year is spent on the 
Iliad. Homeric form and meter are studied and peculiarities of style 
carefully noted. Selections from different books, in amount from 1,500 
to 2,000 lines, are read. 

Goodwin's Greek Grammar and Mather and Hewett's Anabasis, 
Pearson's Greek Prose Composition, Seymour's Iliad are used. 

GERMAN 

German (a). — A careful study of the grammar with special at- 
tention to pronunciation. Easy reading is taken up with the grammar 
work. Drill in prose work throughout the year and some conversation- 
al exercises. Wesselhoeft's Elementary German Grammar is the text. 
During the third term Manley's Ein Sommer in Deutschland is read in 
conjunction with the prose work. The purpose of this course is to 
equip the student with a thorough knowledge of the grammar. 

German (b). — Modern German Prose. Reading of 400 to 500 
pages selected from the works of Nineteenth Century writers. Storm's 
Immensee, Wildenbruch's Das Edle Blut and Der Letzte, Heyse's 
UArrabbiata, Hauff's Das Kalte Herz, Gerstaecker's Germelshausen, 
etc. Constant drills in essentials of grammar. Prose composition one 
hour a week throughout the year. Conversational and dictation exer- 
cises. 

German (c). — Classics: Reading of Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, 
Jungfrau von Orleans or Maria Stuart; Goethe's Hermann and Doro- 
thea or Egmont; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm or Emilia Galotti. 
Three of these classics constitute a year's work. Conversational and 
dictation exercises throughout the year. 

German (d). — Reading of German Classics; Schiller's Wallen- 
stein, Goethe's Dichtung und Wahrheit and Lessing's Nathan der 
Weise, a study of German Literature based upon Priest's History 
of German Literature. Conversational and dictation exercises. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics (a). — 1. Algebra. — Well's Algebra, or its equiv- 
alent, through Factoring. Care will be taken to bring out the relation 
between Algebra and Arithmetic, for the purpose of making the 
transition less abrupt. First term. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 45 

2. Algebra. — Well's, or its equivalent, to Linear Systems of 
Equations. Second term. 

3. Algebra. — Well's, or its equivalent through the simple Quad- 
ratic. Third term. 

Mathematics (b). — Algebra. — Well's, or its equivalent. A thor- 
ough review of Factoring, Simultaneous Equations and the Simple 
Quadratic. Fractional and Negative Exponents to Irrational Equations. 

2. Algebra. — Well's, or its equivalent. Irrational Equations, 
Simultameous Equations of higher degrees, Imaginaries, Proportion, 
Progression, Undetermined Coefficients, Binomial Theorem and 
Logarithms. Completion of Beginning Algebra. Second term. 

3. Plane Geometry. — Books I and II of Well's Geometry, or 
its equivalent. Third term. 

Mathematics (c). — 1. Plane Geometry. — Thorough review of 
Books I and II, and Book III in addition to this. First term. 

2. Plane Geometry. — Completion of Plane Geometry. Second 
term. 

3. Solid Geometry. — Completion of Solid Geometry. Third 
term. 



HISTORY 

History (a). — A year's work is offered in Ancient History with 
special emphasis upon Greek and Roman History. Much general 
reading and drawing of maps illustrative of the text are required. 
Webster's Ancient History and the lvanhoe Historical Note Book 
Series. 

History (b). — A year's work in Modern History. The course 
is a continuation of History (a), with the same requirements as to 
reading and map drawing. Special attention will be given to English 
History and to such other portions of European history as will prepare 
the student for advanced work in American history. 

History (c). — A thorough study of American History, based upon 
such texts as James and Sanford's American History, Fisk, Channing, 
Johnson and McMaster. A part of the year is given to a study of 
municipal, county, state and federal government. Garner's Govern- 
ment in the United States is used as a text. 



46 Moores Hill College Bulletin 



SCIENCE 



Science (a). — Botany. A year's course of high school grade, 
including the Thallophytes, Bryophtes, Pteridophytes and the Sper- 
matophytes. The students are taught the use of the compound micro- 
scope and are required to make drawings of structure observed. The 
course is made as practical as possible. Field work receives much 
attention. 

Science (b). — Physics. The fundamental principles of the sub- 
ject are taught in class room and laboratory. Every effort is made 
to make clear the truths of physics and show how these are made use 
of by man. A year's course is given. 

Science (c). — Physical Geography is presented during the first 
and second terms. All the necessary apparatus and the specimens 
in the Museum are freely used to illustrate the subject. In the third 
term Physiology and Scientific Temperance are taken up and treated 
in a scientific and practical way with special emphasis on all ques- 
tions pertaining to the health of the people. 




Moores Hill College Bulletin 47 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



I— PIANOFORTE 

Mrs. Williams 

Moores Hill is especially well located for a music school, not 
near enough the city to be affected by its distractions, and yet so 
close that occasionally the music students may attend an artist recital 
or symphony concert and the May Festivals. 

The courses of study here prescribed are for earnest students who 
want to attain real excellence; and as very many have in mind the 
work of teaching, their needs have been specially provided for. 

The number of successful teachers who have received their train- 
ing at Moores Hill College attests the thoroughness and broadness of 
the courses. A careful study of the requirements and capabilities of 
each pupil is made, a thorough training in the fundamental principles 
of technique is given and enthusiastic musicians as well as finished 
artists are developed. 

The studies named indicate the range of difficulty belonging to 
the several grades, but it is obvious that lists of pieces sufficient to 
illustrate a wide range of musical literature cannot here be given. 

The time needed for the completion of each grade will average 
not less than a year. Often more time should be taken, especially 
if college studies are pursued at the same time. 

Recitals are held once in three weeks, in which all pupils par- 
ticipate. These furnish incentive to study and experience in public 
performances. 

The following is an outline of the course of study for the 
Pianoforte: 

First Grade (Preparatory). — Gurlitt, opus 117; Loeschhorn, op. 
65, Book 1; Kohler, op. 151. Technical exercises throughout the 
course. 

Second Grade. — Kohler, op. 50; Loeschhorn, op. 65, Books 2 and 
3. Czerny, op. 636; First Studies in Bach. Roger's Octave Studies. 
Easy pieces and sonatinas by Clementi, Kuhlau, Dussek, etc. 

Third Grade. — Loeschhorn, op. 66, Books 1 and 2; Heller, selec- 
tions from op. 47, 46 and 45; Koehler, op. 128, Book 1; Gurliit, op. 
142. the Trill. 



48 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

Fourth Grade. — Loeschhorn, op. 66 } Book 3 ; Doring's op. 24, 
School of Octaves; Jensen, op. 32; Bach's preludes, Sonatas of Haydn 
and Mozart and pieces of modern composers. Elson's Theory of 
Music one hour per week, free. 

Fifth Grade. — Cramer's Etudes (Bulow Ed.) ; Bach's Inventions, 
Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words; Sonatas by Mozart and Bee- 
thoven; Selections from Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, etc. Elements 
of Harmony. 

Sixth Grade. — Kullak's Octave School, Book 2; Clementi's Gradus 
ad Parnassum; Chopin, op. 10; Selections appropriate to this grade 
from Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Bach, Weber and others. His- 
tory of Music, one hour per week, one year, free. 

A musical education should also comprise as much literary work 
as is now done in high schools, and a college course is recommended 
to all who can attain it. Herein lies the advantage of studying music 
in a school where art, literature and science are blended. Here it is 
taught that music is the peer of any branch of human knowledge, but 
that no single line of study is sufficient for complete scholarship. 

Students who complete the course of study as outlined above and 
take in addition to their work in music the following courses from the 
Academy and the College of Liberal Arts will receive a diploma: 

First Year: English (a) ; Latin (a) ; Physical Culture. 

Second Year: English (b) ; History (b) ; Physical Culture (b). 

Third Year: English (c) ; History, (b). 

Fourth Year: English (d) ; German (a). 

Fifth Year: English (B) or History (A). 

Those who, in addition to completing the course in music, have 
received a Bachelor's degree from the College of Liberal Arts, receive 
the degree of Bachelor of Music. 



Note. — Only the literary subjects indicated above will be given 
music and elocution students without additional charge. Should other 
subjects be elected from the literary department, the usual charge for 
special instruction will be made. As many as three regular subjects 
in the literary department make one a matriculant in that department 
and subject to the full college tuition as well as music tuition. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 49 

II— VOICE CULTURE 

Mrs. Wilcox 

The old Italian method of correct breathing and tone placing is 
taught. Special attention is given to technique and the use of such 
vocalises, Solfeggi and songs as are best adapted to the needs of the 
individual pupil. 

Grade i. — Exercises to obtain control of breath and all muscles 
of the body for the correct emission of tone. Natural relaxed position 
of the tongue, lower jaw and larynx. Correct placing of the voice. 
The study of intervals and scales. Exercises for enunciation. Studies 
by Sieber, Abt's Singing Tutor, Concone's Vocalises, opus 9. Simple 
songs by best song writers. 

Grade ii. — Studies in Rhythm and Phrasing. Concone's Vocalises, 
opus 10 and 17. Studies by Vaccai and Nava. Best songs, including 
those by American composers. 

Grade hi. — Exercises for flexibility. Vocalises by Castelli and 
Bonoldi, Marchesi, opus 15 (Italian text). Songs by Schubert, Schu- 
mann, Franz, Gounod and others. 

Grade iv. — Embellishments. Concone's finishing studies, opus 15. 
Vocalises by Panofka and Bordogni. Best English, German, French 
and Italian songs. Arias from operas and oratorios. 

The Moores Hill Choral Society is organized in the fall term and 
runs throughout the year. It meets twice a week and also takes charge 
of the music at the Methodist Episcopal Church of Moores Hill. All 
students of the College and of the Junior and Senior Academy classes 
who can sing are admitted, and the students, both regular and special, 
of the entire music department are required to belong. A one-hour 
credit is given for each term of service in both chorus and choir. 
Credits so obtained may be counted toward either the Academy music 
requirement or on the twelve hours in music permitted to all candidates 
for a degree. 

In the spring term a normal class in sight reading and public 
school music is organized. This course is the same that is offered in 
the largest conservatories and is especially adapted to those persons 
who expect to teach music in either the grades or high school. 

A student in voice who wishes to obtain a diploma must have 
completed all the literary work required of students in instrumental 
music; also the courses in Theory and History of Music. Recitals are 
held frequently and students are required to participate. 



50 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

A pupil will advance only at the judgment of the teacher and 
will receive a diploma only when the teacher is satisfied that he is 
entitled to it and has dene the work satisfactorily. 

For tuition charges for courses in music, see schedule of prices on 
page 15. 

in— VIOLIN AND MANDOLIN 

Miss Moynahan 

For four years the College has had a Department of Violin and 
Mandolin in addition to its flourishing piano and voice departments. 
The department is popular and has grown steadily. 

The history of the violin is one of the most romatic chapters in 
the annals of music. The wonderful capacities of the instrument 
place it at the head of the orchestra, the orchestra being the greatest 
achievement of the human mind in the realm of tone art. 

The following is a brief outline of the course in violin: 

Class A. — Hoghman's Practical Studies for Beginners, Books 1-2. 
This includes the latest and most correct position of the violin and bow, 
with physical exercise of the arms and hands for ease of execution. 

Class B. — Pupils in this class are ready for position work. Wohlf- 
hart's Special Studies for violin, op. 68, is used. In this work the 
young violinist learns the different positions on the keyboard of the 
violin, especially the first and third position. The student then takes 
Dancla's Special Etudes and other progressive studies. 

Class C. — In this class the pupil takes the noted Mazas' Studies: 
Mazas' Special Studies. 
Mazas' Brilliant Studies. 
.as' Artist Studies. 

In these are included the seven positions of the violin and about 
five hundred bowings. By this time the pupil is ready to present aside 
from these studies a complete list of solos studied and three books on 
perfect bowing. 

Class D. — Violin pupils in this class are ready to study Kreutzer- 
Tartini, in books 1-2-3, together with noted sonatas and concertos by 
famous masters. 

Mandolin. — Opportunity is offered students in violin to become 
members of the College Orchestra as soon as the necessary proficiency 
is acquired. A full course in Mandolin is offered; also special instruc- 
tion in band and wind instruments. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 51 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SPEAKING 



Miss Ritter 



The aim of the work in this department is to enable the student 
to be natural and effective in private conversation as well as reading; 
to master the qualities necessary for effective public speaking. 

1. Students are taught the principles of vocal culture applied to 
the natural voice building, the application of gestures and the like. 

2. In private instruction the student is given exercises to develop 
the imagination and emotions, that ability as a speaker may be evolved 
from his own individuality. 

3. The course includes the study and interpretation of selections 
from good literature. 

A year's, work two hours a week, in public speaking is required of 
all candidates for a degree from the College of Liberal Arts. A fuller 
statement in regard to this requirement will be found on page 38. 

All candidates for a diploma from this department must take two 
lessons a week each term of the two years. They must complete in 
addition the literary work that is required of music students. (See page 
48. 

Recitals are held frequently and students are required to par- 
ticipate. 

For tuition charges, see schedule of prices, page 15. 



52 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



Professor Phillips 

The College has a well established department of Agriculture 
and an Experimental Farm to make the work practical. This work 
should appeal to many in the territory of the school. The work is 
open not only to those who wish to specialize in this line, but also to 
teachers and others who may wish it as an aid in their work. The 
following courses are published as giving some idea of what is offered. 

Agriculture is open to students of the Academy and of the College 
of Liberal Arts as an elective subject. Academy students who take up 
the subject are required to complete at least three terms in order to 
receive credit. College students receive a four-hour credit for each 
course completed. 

Teachers' Course. — This is a course including a brief study of 
soils, crops, farm animals, birds and insects, concluding with a study 
of the operations of the farm as a whole. The primary object, how- 
ever, will be to interest the pupil in his surroundings. These exer- 
cises are intended to show young people how to study in a simple but 
scientific way many common things on the farm. The value of these 
experiments lies in the fact that they suggest reading, study and discus- 
sion, and bring the school into harmonious relation with country life 
and affairs. 

Four hours of recitation with laboratory exercises. A four-hour 
credit. 

Shorter Course. — This includes a comprehensive view of the 
field including the subjects: Farm animals, soils, field crops, forestry, 
horticulture and farm management. It is primarily arranged for 
students who can attend only the winter term. Three hours a week in 
recitation and four hours in laboratory for the second term only. 

A. Agonomy (Soils). — This takes up soils from geological, 
physical and chemical standpoints. Three hours a week in recitation 
and four hours in the laboratory for the first term. 

B. Animal Husbandry. — History of breeds, also stock judging 
and stock feeding. Three hours a week in recitation and four hours 

in the laboratory for the second term. 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 53 

C. Agronomy (Farm Crop). — The adaptation of crops to soils 
and seasons; study of rotation, seeding, tillage and harvesting of field 
crops. Three hours in recitation and four hours in laboratory for the 
third term. 

D. Horticulture and Forestry. — Studies of the principles of 
garden and fruit growing; the influence of forests on soils and mois- 
ture; insects and their prevention. Prerequisites, A, B and C. Three 
hours in recitation and two hours in the laboratory for the first term. 

E. Farm Management. — Lectures and discussions upon the man- 
agement of a farm, building, tools, drainage, farm records and accounts 
and other topics connected with farming for a profit. Prerequisites, A, 
B and C. Three hours in recitation and two hours in laboratory for 
the second term. 

F. Rural Life. — Studies and reports from magazines and gov- 
ernment bulletins to bring out the possibilities of rural life along social 
and cultural lines. Prerequisites, A, B and C. Four hours in recita- 
tion, including written and oral reports from each student. 



54 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 

DEGREES CONFERRED 



1913 
(In Cursu) 

Bachelor of Arts 



George MacMakin Ake 



Claude Athel Smith 



Bachelor of Science 



Frederick Christian Baas 
Lloyd Brandon Clinton 
Wallace Edgar Fisher 
Walter Stone Fagley 



Floyd Clarence Holtegel 

Edward George Jann 

Lazarus Basil Lyall 

Eben Elliott Smith 



Bachelor of Literature 
Ulysses Sylvester Hartley John Davis Bartlow 

Diploma In Music 
Lulu Brown Schilling Pauline Shockley 



Academy Diploma 



Robert William Brewington 



Margaretta C. Hester 



Ross Ed ar Carnes 
Willard !.. Clark 
Earl Don;? 
Mary Locke Dashiell 
Leroy Decker 
Roscoe Bain Fleming 
Horace M. Grow 



Susie Newgent King 

Clara Louise Krick 

Mildred Catherine Mulford 

Ama L. Nowlin 

Myrtle Mae Rollins 

Martin Luther Scripture 

Angelina Valentine 

Florence Warneke 



Master of Arts 
Frances Bellamy Taylor 

Doctor of Divinity 

Edward Aquilla Robertson Ulysses Grant Leazenby 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 55 

CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS AND DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts 

Brooks, Elizabeth Moores Hill 

Clark, Edward L London Mills, 111. 

Watkins, Emma Ruth Brcoksburg 

Bachelor of Science 

Bonar, Mary Marguerite Indianapolis 

Briscoe, Hugh Alan New Albany 

Krick, Porter Montgomery Milan 

Lawyer, Helen Charlotte Puebla, Mexico 

McKain, Maurice : . . Brownstown 

Pavy, Josie Blanche Bennington 

Diploma In Music 

Adkins, Gladys Moores Hill 

Academy Diploma 

Browne, Ethel Marie Moores Hill 

Brown, Charles Cleveland Moores Hill 

Canfield, Flossie Marie Moores Hill 

Cook, Glenn Allen Guilford 

Dennerline, George Powell Moores Hill 

Drake, Charles Clifford Moores Hill 

Giimsley, Charles Prichard Moores Hill 

Grimsley, Ralph jay Moores Hill 

Hester, Irma Fern Everton 

Joseph, Effie Catherine Hayden 

Ketcham, Celesta Baker Moores Hill 

Murphy, Philip Arthur Moores Hill 

Smith, Clarence William Moores Hill 

Schilling, Goldie May Moores Hill 

Wilson, Leona Isabella Milan 

Wood, Alfred Joseph Milan 



56 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

STUDENTS 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Note: — The letter "c" indicates the Classical Course, <( s" the 
Scientific Course and "1" the Literary course. 

Post Graduate 

Deich, Valentine Leavenworth 

Hart, Thomas J Dillsboro 

Runyan, William Baldwin, Kan. 

Smith, Eben E Baltimore, Md. 

Stevens, Ora Belle Moores Hill 

Thompson, Virgil W Madison 

Senior Class 

Bonar, Mary Marguerite (s) Indianapolis 

Brooke, Elizabeth (c) Moores Hill 

Briscoe, Hugh Alan (s) New Albany 

Clark, Edward L. (c) London Mills, 111. 

Krick, Porter Montgomery (s) Milan 

Lawyer, Helen Charlotte (s) Puebla, Mex. 

McKain, Maurice (s) Brownstown 

Pavy, Josie Blanche (s) Bennington 

Watkins Emma Ruth (c) Brooksburg 

Junior Class 

Bales, Louis L. (s) Brownstown 

Doles, Eva Marie (s) Clarksburg 

Henderson, Helen Melvina (s) Dillsboro 

Hisey, Stella Josephine (1) Corydon 

Johnston, Edna Moore (s) Manzanola, Colo. 

Kessler, Louvillie (c) Madison 

Knowles, Birdie Leona Vincennes 

Mulford, Haze! Elizabeth (s) Milan 

Riter, Madeleine Brua Cincinnati 

Robertson, Merrill Hoyt Deputy 

Simmons, Nellie A. (1) Crawfordsville 

Singh, Masih Charan (c) Cawnpore, India 

Smith, Richard Herbert Dillsboro 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 57 



Sophomore Class 



Barker, Harriet Hilda (s) Willow Hill, 111. 

Burlingame, Olive Dorothy (s) Moores Hill 

Burlingame, Frank Moores Hill 

Cox, Baird Faville Felix (c) Napoleon 

Cunningham, Florence (s) Rising Sun 

Endsley, Ruth (c) Indianapolis 

Fosbrink, Lillie Elizabeth (s) Vallonia 

Glick, Harry Ralph (s) Hope 

Hester, Edith Maud (s) Everton 

King, Marie Sophia (c) Moores Hill 

Lawyer, Luther Chapin (c) Puebla, Mex. 

Lewis, Florence (s) Moores Hill 

Mitchell Earl Hix (c) Moores Hill 

Risinger, Mary Grace (s) Delaware 

Risinger, Katie Mae (c) Delaware 

Shipman, Gladys Elizabeth (c) Madison 

Smith, Oliver Augustus (s) Moores Hill 

Stevens, Ruth Frances (1) Moores Hill 

Tielking, Norma Louise (1) Milan 

Wright, Stella Olcott (s) Moores Hill 

Freshman Class 

Alter, Clarence Lowell Rushville 

Brown, William Elisha (c) Moores Hill 

Carnes, Ross Edgar (s) French Lick 

Crouch, Lloyd Eugene Edinburg 

Dome, Earl (c) New Albany 

Elwyn, Foss (c) Brookville 

Fleming, Roscoe Bain Moores Hill 

Jenner, John Frank (c) Moores Hill 

Jones, William Talbott (c) Moores Hill 

King, Susie Newgent (c) Moores Hill 

Krick, Clara Louise (s) Milan 

Manley, Flossie May Newberry 

Megenity, Ernest Buchanan (s) Moores Hill 

McKown, Anna Gertrude Greenfield 

Morris, Flossie May (1) Salem 

Moore, Ben Addis ( 1 ) Rising Sun 

Noble, Mary Wilmie Milan 

Smith, Charles Samuel (s) Dillsboro 



53 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

Stevens, Helen Alice Moores Hill 

Scripture, Martin Luther Moores Hill 

Todd, Laura Belle (1) Aurora 

Specials 

Bartlow, John Davis Batesville 

Frensemeier, William L Batesville 

Reagan, Charles A Moores Hill 

Rickard, George M Jeffersonville 

Watson, Steven Lawton Louisville, Ky. 

Walker, Nellie Rising Sun 

EDUCATION 

Class "B" 

Austin, Everett L Osgood 

Bal com, Dorothy May Aurora 

Bodine, Annie Osgood 

Crandell, John Elgin Brooksburg 

Grapy, Cora L Lawrenceburg 

Henderson, Edna Dillsboro 

Lingo, John W Milan 

Mendall, Frances Aurora 

Molony, Julia Gertrude North Vernon 

Mcintosh, Frank B New Salisbury 

Peter, Orpah Ramsey 

Rolline, Myrtle Mae Moores Hill 

Sharer, Ruth Letts 

Shafer, Rutyh Letts 

■ . i, Gertrude Versailles 

Sylvester, Mabel Frances Jeffersonville 

Class "A" 

Abbott, Gladys Gertrude Wheatland 

Beatty, Irene Estelle Hayden 

Biedert, Elsie Marguerite Lovett 

Bre.viugton, Robert William Moores Hill 

Cain,. Ruth Wheatland 

Crawford, Ary E Ramsey 

Decker Lero Holton 

Dugle, Grace Louise Rising Sun 

it, Frances Aurora 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 59 

Fosbrink, Lillie Elizabeth Vallonia 

Foster, Evangeline Moores Hill 

Groenier, Marguerite Greensburg 

Hawk, Ruth Almira r North Vernon 

Hester, Mai garetta Everton 

Henderson, Edna M Dillsboro 

Hickman, Anna Lee Batesville 

Mines, Loren S Vevay 

Jackson, Bertha M Lawrenceburg 

jolley, Emma M Osgood 

Krick, Clara Louise Milan 

Licking, Erma Esther Bear Branch 

Lostutter, Clyde Dibble Aurora 

Mendall, Edna Aurora 

Molony, Marguerite . . North Vernon 

Morrison, Thelma Elvessa Fairview 

Morris, Flossie May Salem 

Mulford, Mildred Catherine Moores Hill 

Newland, Grace Connersville 

Reagan, Millie Mae Mauckport 

Richter, Martha Mae Bennington 

Richmond, Rose E Rising Sun 

Rollins, Myrtle Mae Moores Hill 

Shafer, Ruth Letts 

Stroud, Milby Raymond Birdseye 

Shadday, Wilmer Leatherbury Vevay 

Shake, Brooks B Rising Sun 

Schwade, Mary Catherine Rising Sun 

Terrill, Thomas Edward Aurora 

Terrill, Alice M Aurora 

Twineham, Cascellia Inez Bennington 

White, Nellie May Patriot 

Williams, Almeda Bourie Aurora 

Wiseman, Blanche Ramsey 

Wood, Grace Marengo 

Wood, J. Ralph Marengo 



60 Moores Hill College Bulletin . 

ACADEMY 

Senior Class 

Browne, Ethel Marie Moores Hill 

Brown, Charles Cleveland Moores Hill 

Canfield, Flossie Marie Moores Hill 

Cook, Glenn Allen Guilford 

Dennerline, George Powell Moores Hill 

Drake, Charles Clifford Moores Hill 

Grimsley, Charles Prichard Moores Hill 

Grimsley, Ralph Jay Moores Hill 

Hester, Irma Fern Everton 

Joseph, Effie Catherine Hayden 

Ketcham, Celesta Baker Moores Hill 

Mahler, Wesley Curtis Sunman 

Murphy, Philip Arthur Moores Hill 

Smith, Clarence William Moores Hill 

Schilling, Goldie May Moores Hill 

W T ilson, Leona Isabella Milan 

Wood, Alfred Joseph Milan 

Junior Class 

Bacon, Charles Marion Vincennes 

Beardsley, Ora John Dale 

Beckett, Reba Versailles 

Bultman, Alvie Grace Versailles 

Craven, Lester David Moores Hill 

Dennis, John Wesley Moores Hill 

Deen, Christina Oriole 

Evans, Minnie Frances Moores Hili 

Fleming, Mary Lois Moores Hill 

Garrigues, Ruth Florence Brookville 

Griffin, Mabel Aurora 

Hyatt, George Flavius Benham 

Holtegel, Mildred Naomi Dillsboro 

Hunter, Lora Elizabeth Versailles 

Johnson, Ramona Fern Moores Hill 

Ketcham, Rolland Hall Moores Hill 

Kisner, Harry O Farmersburg 

Lawyer, Paul Carey Puebla, Mex. 

Lewis, George Goodner Moores Hill 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 61 

Niebrugge, Ella Ruth Moores Hill 

Niemeyer, Laura Marie Dillsboro 

Rumsey, John Wilbur Moores Hill 

Richardson, Marguerite Amelia Moores Hill 

Schilling, Alloysius Kenneth Moores Hill 

Shaf er, Lloyd Hamline Letts 

Stevens, Joseph H New Salisbury 

Wilson, Otis Melvell Aurora 

Withered, George Duncan Aurora 

Sophomore Class 

Adams, William Lynn Moores Hill 

Bricka, Edna Laura Milan 

Bossong, Frances Eugenia Moores Hill 

Brewington, Mildred Pearl Moores Hill 

Becker, Floyd Moores Hil I 

Cooper, Joseph McCain Moores Hill 

Craven, Franklin Forest Moores Hill 

Deen, Thirza Avenell Oriole 

Donaker, Will A Columbus 

Evans, Harold Miller Moores Hill 

Hansell, Amy May Harrison, O. 

Hoppmire, Willis Smith Moores Hill 

Hyatt, Joseph Lewis Benham 

Maupin, Ruth Juanita Moores Hill 

Morris, Marshall Moores Hill 

Shipe, Mary Katherine Kansas City, Mo. 

Smith, May Moores Hill 

Spencer, Harriet Anna Moores Hill 

Wilson, Marguerite Butlerville 

Wilson, Adlai Ernest Moores Hill 

Wilson, Nellie Barricklow Moores Hill 

Freshman Class 

Bossong, Mary Matilda Moores Hill 

Campbell, Wilbur Alonzo Fairview 

Evans, Mary Alice Moores Hill 

Grimsley, Percy Earl Moores Hill 

Hole, Ruth Butlerville 

Ketcham, Nina Belle Moores Hill 

Mack, John Seymour 



62 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

Mack, Helen Frances Pierceville 

Maupin, Lelia Bernice Moores Hill 

Morin, Chauncey Owen Moores Hill 

Niebrugge, Floyd Willard Moores Hill 

Richardson, Marian Selena Moores Hill 

Schilling, Marcella Elizabeth Moores Hill 

Sturm, Roy Albert Wickliffe 

Sedam, Geneva May Moores Hill 

Turner, Grace Corinne Moores Hill 

Turner, Lorene Frances Moores Hill 

Turner, Robert Warren Moores Hill 

Watkins, Lois Jennie Brooksburg 

Williams, Esta Gladys Moores Hill 

Withered, Lester Harold Aurora 

Specials 

Fletcher, Charles W Moores Hill 

So Leng Ling Hankong, China 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Piano 

Adkins, Gladys ( Senior) Moores Hill 

Adkins, Velma Moores Hill 

Bird, Mabel Greensburg 

Bowers, Florence A. (Post-Graduate) Moores Hill 

Brown, Sharlet E Moores Hill 

Bedunnah, Otta Moores Hill 

Burke, Mana Memphis 

Canfield, Flossie Marie Moores Hill 

Cox, Baird Faville Felix Napoleon 

Cunningham, Florence Rising Sun 

Dashiell, Mary Locke Moores Hill 

Ferguson, Lecetta Spurgeon 

Fleming, Helen Moores Hill 

Fleming, Mary Lois Moores Hill 

Gorman, Burton Moores Hill 

Hester, Edith Maude Everton 

Hisey, OUie Mae Corydon 

Hite, Marie New Salem 

Kessler, Louwiliie Madison 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 63 

Krick, Clara Louise Milan 

Manley, Flossie May Newberry 

Maupin, Lelia Bernice Moores Hill 

Maupin, Ruth Juanita Moores Hill 

Meyers, Flora Aurora 

Megenity, Grace Moores Hill 

Mulford, Mildred Catherine Moores Hill 

McKown, Anna Gertrude Greenfield 

Newland, Grace Connersville 

Nowlin, Martha Belle Lawrenceburg 

Risinger, Katie Mae Delaware 

Risinger, Mary Grace Delaware 

Robertson, Orintha Moores Hill 

Schultz, Charlotte Caroline Moores Hill 

Shipe, Mary Katherine Moores Hill 

Shockley, Evelyn '. Moores Hill 

Stevens, Ruth Frances Moores Hill 

Sturm, Roy Albert Wickliffe 

Todd, Laura Belle Aurora 

Turner, Grace Corinne Moores Hill 

Warner, Beulah Moores Hill 

Wright, Stella Olcott Moores Hill 

Voice 

Bowers, Florence A Moores Hill 

Brooks, Elizabeth Moores Hill 

Brown, Sharlet E Moores Hill 

Foster, Evangeline Moores Hill 

Hester, Irraa Fern Everton 

Hisey, Ollie Mae Corydon 

Johnson, Ramona Fern Moores Hill 

Maupin, Ruth Juanita Moores Hill 

Noble, Stella Pierson Milan 

Nowlin, Arna L Lawrenceburg 

Schwartz, Fred Wilbur Moores Hill 

Shipe, Mary Katherine Moores Hill 

Winold, Frances King Cincinnati, O. 

Violin 

Bedunnah, Mildred Moores Hill 

Dashiell, Edyth Moores Hill 

Daubenheyer, Helen B Butlervilie 



64 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

Grimsley, Joyce Moores Hill 

Hensil, Isabelle Milan 

Hester, Irma Fern Everton 

Houston, Stewart Russell Brownstown 

King,Susie Newgent Moores Hill 

Mulford, Mildred Moores Hill 

Niebrugge, Floyd Moores Hill 

Robertson, Paul Moores Hill 

Smith, Richard Herbert Dillsboro 

Sherrod, Nelle Lawrenceburg 

Smivh, Oliver Augustus Moores Hill 

Young, Carl Osgood 

Mandolin 

Niebrugge, Floyd Moores Hill 

Cornet 

Grimsley, Charles H Moores Hill 

Mitchell, Earl Hix Moores Hill 

Normal Music 

Bodine, Annie Osgood 

Fosbrink, Lillie Elizabeth Vallonia 

Groenier, Marguerite Greensburg 

Jackson, Bertha M Lawrenceburg 

Mcintosh, Frank B New Salisbury 

Rollins, Myrtle Mae Moores Hill 

Moores MHill College Quartet 

Mary Moynahan First Violin 

Edith Dashiell Second Violin 

Susie King Third Violin 

Oliver A. Smith Fourth Violin 

Mrs. E. Louise Williams Piano 

Moores Hill College Band 

Director, Oliver A. Smith 

Oliver A. Smith Solo B Flat Cornet 

Charles W. Maupin , Solo Cornet 

Harry Glick First Cornet 

Earl Dome , Second Cornet 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 65 

Charles P. Grimsley Third Cornet 

Charles S. Smith First Alto 

Otis Wilson Second Alto 

Ralph J. Grimsley Third Alto 

Clarence W. Smith First Trombone 

Earl H. Mitchell Baritone 

Paul C. Lawyer B Flat Bass 

M. Luther Scripture E Flat Bass 

Fred W. Schwartz Drums 

ART DEPARTMENT 

China Painting 

Bird, Mabel Greensburg 

Bowers, Florence A Moores Hill 

Dashiell, Mary Locke Moores Hill 

Doles, Eva Marie Clarksburg 

Henderson, Edna Dillsboro 

Smith, Bertie Milan 

Water Color 

Shipe, Louise Moores Hill 

Turner, Lorene Frances Moores Hill 

Warner, Beulah Moores Hill 

History of Art 

Stevens, Helen Alice Moores Hill 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Brown, Charles C Moores Hill 

Brown, William E Moores Hill 

Becker, Floyd Moores Hill 

Beardsley, Ora John Dale 

Briscoe, Hugh Alan New Albany 

Barker, Harriet Hilda Willow Hill 

Bossong, Frances Eugenia Moores Hill 

Bossong, Mary Matilda Moores Hill 

Cunningham, Florence Rising Sun 

Cooper, Joseph McCain * Moores Hill 

Crouch, Lloyd Eugene Edinburg 

Dennis, John Wesley Moores Hill 



66 Moores Hill College Bulletin 

Dome, Earl New Albany 

Doles, Eva Marie Clarksburg 

Evans, Minnie Frances Moores Hill 

Glick, Harry Ralph Hope 

Henderson, Helen Melvina Dillsboro 

Hester, Edith Maude Everton 

Hisey, Stella Josephine Corydon 

Johnston, Edna Moore Manzanola, Colo. 

Krick, Porter Montgomery Milan 

King, Marie Sophia Moores Hill 

Kessler, Louwillie Madison 

Knowles, Birdie Leona Vincennes 

Lawyer, Helen Charlotte Puebla, Mex. 

Lawyer, Luther Chapin Puebla, Mex. 

Mack, Helen Frances Pierceville 

Mitchell, Earl Hix Moores Hill 

Moore, Ben Addis Rising Sun ■ 

McKain, Maurice Brownstown 

McKown, Anna Gertrude Greenfield 

Mulford, Hazel Elizabeth Milan 

Nowlin, Ama L Lawrenceburg 

Risinger, Katie May Delaware 

Risinger, Mary Grace Delaware 

Richardson, Marguerite Amelia Moores Hill 

Shipman, Gladys Elizabeth Madison 

Scripture, Martin Luther Moores Hill 

Simmons, Nellie A Crawfordsville 

Smith, Oliver Augustus Moores Hill 

Stevens, Joseph New Salisbury 

Schwartz, Fred Wilbur Moores Hill 

Tielking, Norma Louise Milan 

Wright, Stella Olcott Moores Hill 

Winold, Frances King Cincinnati 

Watkins, Lois Jennie Brooksburg 

SUMMARY 

College of Liberal Arts 

Post-graduates 6 

Seniors 9 

Juniors 13 

Sophomores 20 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 67 

Freshmen 21 

Freshmen (Education) 61 

Specials 6 

Total 136 

Academy 

Seniors 17 

Juniors 28 

Sophomores 21 

Freshmen 21 

Specials 2 

Total ' .... 89 

Department of Music 

Piano 42 

Voice 13 

Violin 15 

Mandolin 1 

Normal Music 6 

Cornet 2 

Orchestra 4 

Band 13 

Total 96 

Department of Art 

China Painting 6 

Water Color 3 

History 1 

Total 10 

Department of Public Speaking 46 

Summer School (1913) 61 

Totals 438 

Names repeated 184 

Net Total 254 



68 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 



INDEX 



Absences 21 

Academy 39 

Academy Students in 60 

Admission to Freshman Class.16 
Agriculture, Department of.. 52 

Algebra 33, 44 

Alumni Associations 14 

Alumni Visitors 5 

Ancient Languages, Depart- 
ment of 26 

Arithmetic 35, 39 

Art, Department of 36 

Art Department, Students in. 65 

Astronomy 31 

Athletics 13 

Band 64 

Biology 31 

Board and Lodging 15 

Board of Trustees 4 

Botany 31, 46 

Buildings 11 

Calculus 33 

Candidates for Diplomas and 

Degrees 55 

Chemistry 32 

Christian Associations 12 

Class A, Course for 36 

Class A, Teachers of 58 

Class B, Course for 36 

Class B, Teachers of 58 

College Calendar 3 

College of Liberal Arts 16 

Committees of Board of 

Trustees 5 

Conference Visitors 4 

Course of Study — Academy. .40 
Course of Study— College. 21-23 
Degrees, Courses Leading to. 19 
Degrees Conferred, June, 
1913 54 



Departments of the College.. 25 

Economics 30 

Education, Department of. . . .35 

Education, Students in 58 

Electives 17, 20 

Embryology 31 

English and History, Depart- 
ment of 29 

English Bible, Department 

of 25 

English Composition and Lit- 
erature 29, 42 

Entertainments '. 9 

Entrance Requirements 17 

Entrance Suggestions 16, 39 

Ethics 34 

Examinations 21, 41 

Expenses 15 

Extra Studies 20 

Faculty 7 

Faculty Committees 6 

Fees 15 

French 29 

Freshman Class 57 

General Information 10 

General Regulations 20 

Geology 31 

Geometry 33, 45 

German 27, 44 

Graduate Department 38 

Greek 26, 43 

Gymnasium 10 

High Schools, Admission 

from 16 

History 30, 45 

History of College 10 

Histology 31 

History of Education 35 

International Law 30 

Junior Class 56 



Moores Hill College Bulletin 



69 



Lectures 9 

Latin 26, 43 

Library, 11 

Literary Societies 13 

Literature 29 

Location of College 10 

Logic 34 

Masters' Degrees 38 

Mathematics, Department of. 33 

Metaphysics 34 

Methods 35 

Ministers, Courses for 13 

Modern Languages, Depart- 
ment of 27 

Museum 32 

Music, Department of . . . .36, 47 

Music, Students in 62 

Normal Instruction 35, 40 

Observation 35 

Officers of Board of Trustees. 5 

Oratorical Association 13 

Orchestra 68 

Parallel Courses 21, 23 

Philosophy, Deparment of . . . .34 
Physical Education, Depart- 
ment of 37 

Physical Geography 46 

Physical Sciences, Depart- 
ment of 31 

Physics 33, 46 

Physiology 31, 46 

Piano 47 

Piano, Students in 62 

Political and Social Science.. 30 

Post Graduate Students 56 

Press Club 14 

Psychology 34, 35 

Public Speaking, Department 

of 36, 51 

Public Speaking, Students in. 65 
Religious Influence 12 



Recitations, Schedule of 34 

Requirements for Admission: 

Academy 39 

College of Liberal Arts... 16 
Requirements for Graduation: 

Academy 41 

College of Liberal Arts 19 

Registration 16 

Schedule of Recitations, 1914- 

15 24 

Scholaraship, Charles Willard 

Lewis 14 

Senior Class 56 

Societies 13 

Sociology . . . .' 30 

Sophomore Class 57 

Student Council 13 

Studies, Prescribed and Elect- 
ive 19, 41 

Students, Roll of 56 

Summary of Students 66 

Summer Term 12 

Surveying 33 

Teachers, Admission of 16 

Teachers, Courses for 35 

Terms and Vacationc 3 

Trigonometry 33 

Trustees 4, 11 

Tuition 15 

Vacations 3 

Violin and Mandolin 50 

Violin and Mandolin, Stu- 
dents in 63, 6* 

Voice Culture ...49 

Voice, Students in 63 

WomansAuxiliary 14 

Young Woman's Christian 

Association 12 

Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation 12 

Zoology 31 



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